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On the Librarianship of Poverty

On the Librarianship of Poverty On the Libmrianship ofPoverty K. J. MCHOMBU This paper attempts to outline the main characteristics of Librarianship under the conditions ofpoverty. To the best of my knowledge and conviction, this is the base on which any meaningful discussion of Information Work in underdeveloped countries should be firmly anchored. The goal of my paper is to set up and elaborate on four principles that, in my view, determine the social relevance of Information Work in developing countries. This is a personal testament, and I hasten to add that the views expressed hereafter do not necessarily represent the official position of my employers -- the Tanzania Library Service. Similarly, criticism is not directed at any particular Institution or person. Should it appear so, I offer my sincere apologies. 1.1 If their work is to be relevant to society, Information Workers must formulate terms of reference that are consistent with the needs of underdeveloped societies. At the moment, it seems to me that such terms of reference are largely non-existent, and where they do exist they are vague and frequently irrelevant. Given below are the principles that I believe can help in formulating the appropriate terms of reference (and justify the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Libri - International Journal of Libraries and Information Services de Gruyter

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References (8)

Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0024-2667
eISSN
1865-8423
DOI
10.1515/libr.1982.32.1.241
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

On the Libmrianship ofPoverty K. J. MCHOMBU This paper attempts to outline the main characteristics of Librarianship under the conditions ofpoverty. To the best of my knowledge and conviction, this is the base on which any meaningful discussion of Information Work in underdeveloped countries should be firmly anchored. The goal of my paper is to set up and elaborate on four principles that, in my view, determine the social relevance of Information Work in developing countries. This is a personal testament, and I hasten to add that the views expressed hereafter do not necessarily represent the official position of my employers -- the Tanzania Library Service. Similarly, criticism is not directed at any particular Institution or person. Should it appear so, I offer my sincere apologies. 1.1 If their work is to be relevant to society, Information Workers must formulate terms of reference that are consistent with the needs of underdeveloped societies. At the moment, it seems to me that such terms of reference are largely non-existent, and where they do exist they are vague and frequently irrelevant. Given below are the principles that I believe can help in formulating the appropriate terms of reference (and justify the

Journal

Libri - International Journal of Libraries and Information Servicesde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1982

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