OBSERVATIONS ON MAMMALS OF MT. SONTRA, SOUTH VIETNAM

OBSERVATIONS ON MAMMALS OF MT. SONTRA, SOUTH VIETNAM INTRODUCTION Wild mammals were trapped on the slopes and at the base of a mountain complex (Mount Sontra) forming the tip of a peninsula in South Vietnam. Mammals were collected to provide baseline data on taxonomy, distributions and habitats, and Mt. Sontra offered the advantages of accessibility and safety -- it is surrounded by Allied military forces or by ocean. A disadvantage was possible faunistic isolation, although populations on Mt. Sontra seemed ecologically similar to others we have studied elsewhere in South Vietnam. A previous paper was concerned with tick-host relationships in this area (Hoogstraal et al, 1968). The present report lists mammals collected and provides notes on some of the species. MATERIALS AND METHODS Surveys were at irregular intervals during January-June 1966, August-October 1967, March-April 1968, and March-May 1969. Because of military operational requirements, trapping and observations usually could only be accomplished during daylight. We obtained permission to sboot macaques on * From the Bureau Medicine and Surgery, Navy Department, Research Task No. M4305.12-3004. The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private ones of the authors and are not to be construed as official or reflecting the views of the Navy Department or the Naval service http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mammalia - International Journal of the Systematics, Biology and Ecology of Mammals de Gruyter

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0025-1461
eISSN
1864-1547
DOI
10.1515/mamm.1971.35.1.126
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTION Wild mammals were trapped on the slopes and at the base of a mountain complex (Mount Sontra) forming the tip of a peninsula in South Vietnam. Mammals were collected to provide baseline data on taxonomy, distributions and habitats, and Mt. Sontra offered the advantages of accessibility and safety -- it is surrounded by Allied military forces or by ocean. A disadvantage was possible faunistic isolation, although populations on Mt. Sontra seemed ecologically similar to others we have studied elsewhere in South Vietnam. A previous paper was concerned with tick-host relationships in this area (Hoogstraal et al, 1968). The present report lists mammals collected and provides notes on some of the species. MATERIALS AND METHODS Surveys were at irregular intervals during January-June 1966, August-October 1967, March-April 1968, and March-May 1969. Because of military operational requirements, trapping and observations usually could only be accomplished during daylight. We obtained permission to sboot macaques on * From the Bureau Medicine and Surgery, Navy Department, Research Task No. M4305.12-3004. The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private ones of the authors and are not to be construed as official or reflecting the views of the Navy Department or the Naval service

Journal

Mammalia - International Journal of the Systematics, Biology and Ecology of Mammalsde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1971

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