Obesity-associated sympathetic overactivity in children and adolescents: the role of catecholamine resistance in lipid metabolism

Obesity-associated sympathetic overactivity in children and adolescents: the role of... Abstract Background: Obesity in children and adolescents is characterized by chronic sympathetic overdrive and reduced epinephrine-stimulated lipolysis. This resistance to catecholamines occurs during the dynamic phase of fat accumulation. This review will focus on the relationship between sympathetic-adrenal activity and lipid metabolism, thereby highlighting the role of catecholamine resistance in the development of childhood obesity. Results and conclusions: Catecholamine resistance causes lipid accumulation in adipose tissue by reducing lipolysis, increasing lipogenesis and impeding free fatty acid (FFA) transportation. Exercise improves catecholamine resistance, as evidenced by attenuated systemic sympathetic activity, reduced circulating catecholamine levels and enhanced β-adrenergic receptor signaling. Insulin resistance is mostly a casual result rather than a cause of childhood obesity. Therefore, catecholamine resistance in childhood obesity may promote insulin signaling in adipose tissue, thereby increasing lipogenesis. This review outlines a series of evidence for the role of catecholamine resistance as an upstream mechanism leading to childhood obesity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism de Gruyter

Obesity-associated sympathetic overactivity in children and adolescents: the role of catecholamine resistance in lipid metabolism

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by the
ISSN
0334-018X
eISSN
2191-0251
D.O.I.
10.1515/jpem-2015-0182
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Background: Obesity in children and adolescents is characterized by chronic sympathetic overdrive and reduced epinephrine-stimulated lipolysis. This resistance to catecholamines occurs during the dynamic phase of fat accumulation. This review will focus on the relationship between sympathetic-adrenal activity and lipid metabolism, thereby highlighting the role of catecholamine resistance in the development of childhood obesity. Results and conclusions: Catecholamine resistance causes lipid accumulation in adipose tissue by reducing lipolysis, increasing lipogenesis and impeding free fatty acid (FFA) transportation. Exercise improves catecholamine resistance, as evidenced by attenuated systemic sympathetic activity, reduced circulating catecholamine levels and enhanced β-adrenergic receptor signaling. Insulin resistance is mostly a casual result rather than a cause of childhood obesity. Therefore, catecholamine resistance in childhood obesity may promote insulin signaling in adipose tissue, thereby increasing lipogenesis. This review outlines a series of evidence for the role of catecholamine resistance as an upstream mechanism leading to childhood obesity.

Journal

Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolismde Gruyter

Published: Feb 1, 2016

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