NOTES AND DISCUSSION

NOTES AND DISCUSSION NOTES AND DISCUSSION A PRACTICAL THEORY OF SYNTAX FOR TRANSLATION* P. C. Ganeshsundaram 0. Introduction: The entire theory of syntax depends on an exact morphological definition of the Verb used as a predicate* in a 'proposition', all other associated elements being 'arguments* to the predicate. If a definition of the Verb, morphological or otherwise, is difficult to arrive at, one could at least identify the characteristics of a verb by listing them, or identify the verbs by listing the verbs themselves. In other words the 'Verb' is one of our primitive concepts, more or less taken to be a self-evident entity on an intuitive basis. In whatever way a Verb has been conceived, all syntactic structures are defined in terms of it. For purposes of translation, the levels of syntax, morphology and lexicon are mutually matched between any two languages that form the source and target languages of translation, in order to relate the respective language specific characteristics. It is assumed further that the underlying 'universal' amorphous syntax is the same for both languages. 1. Definitions: 1.1. Morphological and syntactic constructions can occur as telescopic structures one within the other in an almost endless chain, limited only by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png IRAL - International Review of Applied Linguistics in Language Teaching de Gruyter

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0019-042X
eISSN
1613-4141
DOI
10.1515/iral.1976.14.4.373
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

NOTES AND DISCUSSION A PRACTICAL THEORY OF SYNTAX FOR TRANSLATION* P. C. Ganeshsundaram 0. Introduction: The entire theory of syntax depends on an exact morphological definition of the Verb used as a predicate* in a 'proposition', all other associated elements being 'arguments* to the predicate. If a definition of the Verb, morphological or otherwise, is difficult to arrive at, one could at least identify the characteristics of a verb by listing them, or identify the verbs by listing the verbs themselves. In other words the 'Verb' is one of our primitive concepts, more or less taken to be a self-evident entity on an intuitive basis. In whatever way a Verb has been conceived, all syntactic structures are defined in terms of it. For purposes of translation, the levels of syntax, morphology and lexicon are mutually matched between any two languages that form the source and target languages of translation, in order to relate the respective language specific characteristics. It is assumed further that the underlying 'universal' amorphous syntax is the same for both languages. 1. Definitions: 1.1. Morphological and syntactic constructions can occur as telescopic structures one within the other in an almost endless chain, limited only by

Journal

IRAL - International Review of Applied Linguistics in Language Teachingde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1976

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