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New speakers and processes of new speakerness across time and space

New speakers and processes of new speakerness across time and space Applied Linguistics Review 2015; 6(2): 145­150 Open Access DOI 10.1515/applirev-2015-0007 The theorizing and conceptualization of the new speaker label first emerged from discussions amongst a small group of researchers working on some of Europe's lesser-used languages including Catalan (Pujolar 2007; Pujolar and Gonzàlez 2013), Galician (O'Rourke and Ramallo 2011 and O'Rourke and Ramallo 2013) and Irish (O'Rourke 2011). These are languages which were revitalized with some measure of success as a result of more favourable language policies, but which faced the consequent problem of social differentiation between first- and second-language speakers, and tensions over ownership of and legitimate language rights. While these problems have often tended to be unforeseen by language advocates and policymakers, they have been encountered so often in different minority language revitalization contexts, that there came to be an underlying recognition amongst many researchers, that they should be theorized and examined more schematically. This discussion was extended to include other minority languages in Europe such as Breton, Occitan, Manx and Corsican, leading to a full special issue relating to new speakers of minority languages (see O'Rourke et al. 2015). In all these contexts, there was a growing awareness amongst sociolinguists and policy makers that the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Linguistics Review de Gruyter

New speakers and processes of new speakerness across time and space

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by the
ISSN
1868-6303
eISSN
1868-6311
DOI
10.1515/applirev-2015-0007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Applied Linguistics Review 2015; 6(2): 145­150 Open Access DOI 10.1515/applirev-2015-0007 The theorizing and conceptualization of the new speaker label first emerged from discussions amongst a small group of researchers working on some of Europe's lesser-used languages including Catalan (Pujolar 2007; Pujolar and Gonzàlez 2013), Galician (O'Rourke and Ramallo 2011 and O'Rourke and Ramallo 2013) and Irish (O'Rourke 2011). These are languages which were revitalized with some measure of success as a result of more favourable language policies, but which faced the consequent problem of social differentiation between first- and second-language speakers, and tensions over ownership of and legitimate language rights. While these problems have often tended to be unforeseen by language advocates and policymakers, they have been encountered so often in different minority language revitalization contexts, that there came to be an underlying recognition amongst many researchers, that they should be theorized and examined more schematically. This discussion was extended to include other minority languages in Europe such as Breton, Occitan, Manx and Corsican, leading to a full special issue relating to new speakers of minority languages (see O'Rourke et al. 2015). In all these contexts, there was a growing awareness amongst sociolinguists and policy makers that the

Journal

Applied Linguistics Reviewde Gruyter

Published: Jun 1, 2015

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