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Metal-catalyzed reactions in water

Metal-catalyzed reactions in water Green Process Synth 2014; 3: 395 Book review DOI 10.1515/gps-2014-0059 Pierre H. Dixneuf and Victorio Cadierno (Eds.) Wiley-VCH, 2013 Hardcover/e-book, 407 pp. Price: US$ 210.00 (hardcover), US$ 168.99 (e-book) ISBN print: 978-3-527-33188-8 ISBN online: 978-3-527-65679-0 The book Metal-catalyzed reactions in water provides a broad overview of the current state-of-the-art metal catalysis in and on water. Water as a solvent in organic reactions has received considerable interest in recent years. The advantages of water as a solvent are its sustainable, non-toxic, nonflammable nature and the enhancement of greenness of a process, i.e., by reducing the required amount of organic solvent. The book by P. H. Dixneuf and V. Cadierno provides several examples where the merger of metal catalysis and the use of water whether as co-solvent or solvent can have additional advantages. It is shown that higher reaction rates can be achieved by the use of water, but also that it allows the reuse of water soluble catalysts in a biphasic system and catalyst immobilization by using supported water films in a three-phasic system (gas/organic phase/aqueous phase), e.g., for hydroformylations. The book covers all the major areas of homogeneous metal-catalyzed transformations ranging from classical cross-coupling via C-H activation, nucleophilic addition of alkynes, hydroformylation, oxidation and hydrogenation, rearrangements and allylations to alkene metathesis in water which are all discussed in separate chapters. The last chapter deals with nanocatalysis in water. Whereas for several examples in the previous chapters it is indicated that nano-sized species could be involved in the catalysis, this chapter focuses on the intentional use of nanocatalysts. Each of the nine chapters has an introduction, a conclusion and references. In the introduction the chapter authors give the historical background, limitations of the covered area and the utility of water as a solvent for the discussed transformation. At the end, the current state-of-the-art is summarized and future perspectives are discussed. In conclusion, the book reaches the goal of the authors to introduce the reader to the innovative field of metal catalysis in water by providing a broad summary of cutting-edge results from the literature and the knowhow shared by the chapter authors. Moreover, it is easy to read which makes the book attractive not only for researchers but also for interested students and teachers. In this context, it would have been advantageous to include a short discussion on the controversial debate about water as a green solvent in the general introduction (Blackmond, D.G.; Armstrong, A.; Coombe, V.; Wells, A. Angew. Chem. 2007, 119, 3872­3874; Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2007, 46, 3798­3800.). Nonetheless the chapter authors use the introductory part of their section to provide their opinion on the greenness of water as a solvent. The author of chapter 5 Roger A. Sheldon finds the right expression by saying that there are many shades of green. Overall the book is recommendable to get a broad overview over state-of-the-art metal-catalyzed reaction in and on water as well as to get inspiration to improve the greenness of a process. Nico Erdmann Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry Eindhoven University of Technology Den Dolech 2 5612 AZ Eindhoven The Netherlands E-mail: N.E.Erdmann@tue.nl http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Green Processing and Synthesis de Gruyter

Metal-catalyzed reactions in water

Green Processing and Synthesis , Volume 3 (5) – Oct 1, 2014

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by the
ISSN
2191-9542
eISSN
2191-9550
DOI
10.1515/gps-2014-0059
Publisher site
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Abstract

Green Process Synth 2014; 3: 395 Book review DOI 10.1515/gps-2014-0059 Pierre H. Dixneuf and Victorio Cadierno (Eds.) Wiley-VCH, 2013 Hardcover/e-book, 407 pp. Price: US$ 210.00 (hardcover), US$ 168.99 (e-book) ISBN print: 978-3-527-33188-8 ISBN online: 978-3-527-65679-0 The book Metal-catalyzed reactions in water provides a broad overview of the current state-of-the-art metal catalysis in and on water. Water as a solvent in organic reactions has received considerable interest in recent years. The advantages of water as a solvent are its sustainable, non-toxic, nonflammable nature and the enhancement of greenness of a process, i.e., by reducing the required amount of organic solvent. The book by P. H. Dixneuf and V. Cadierno provides several examples where the merger of metal catalysis and the use of water whether as co-solvent or solvent can have additional advantages. It is shown that higher reaction rates can be achieved by the use of water, but also that it allows the reuse of water soluble catalysts in a biphasic system and catalyst immobilization by using supported water films in a three-phasic system (gas/organic phase/aqueous phase), e.g., for hydroformylations. The book covers all the major areas of homogeneous metal-catalyzed transformations ranging from classical cross-coupling via C-H activation, nucleophilic addition of alkynes, hydroformylation, oxidation and hydrogenation, rearrangements and allylations to alkene metathesis in water which are all discussed in separate chapters. The last chapter deals with nanocatalysis in water. Whereas for several examples in the previous chapters it is indicated that nano-sized species could be involved in the catalysis, this chapter focuses on the intentional use of nanocatalysts. Each of the nine chapters has an introduction, a conclusion and references. In the introduction the chapter authors give the historical background, limitations of the covered area and the utility of water as a solvent for the discussed transformation. At the end, the current state-of-the-art is summarized and future perspectives are discussed. In conclusion, the book reaches the goal of the authors to introduce the reader to the innovative field of metal catalysis in water by providing a broad summary of cutting-edge results from the literature and the knowhow shared by the chapter authors. Moreover, it is easy to read which makes the book attractive not only for researchers but also for interested students and teachers. In this context, it would have been advantageous to include a short discussion on the controversial debate about water as a green solvent in the general introduction (Blackmond, D.G.; Armstrong, A.; Coombe, V.; Wells, A. Angew. Chem. 2007, 119, 3872­3874; Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2007, 46, 3798­3800.). Nonetheless the chapter authors use the introductory part of their section to provide their opinion on the greenness of water as a solvent. The author of chapter 5 Roger A. Sheldon finds the right expression by saying that there are many shades of green. Overall the book is recommendable to get a broad overview over state-of-the-art metal-catalyzed reaction in and on water as well as to get inspiration to improve the greenness of a process. Nico Erdmann Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry Eindhoven University of Technology Den Dolech 2 5612 AZ Eindhoven The Netherlands E-mail: N.E.Erdmann@tue.nl

Journal

Green Processing and Synthesisde Gruyter

Published: Oct 1, 2014

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