Long-fingered bats of the genus Miniopterus (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae) from Madagascar

Long-fingered bats of the genus Miniopterus (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae) from Madagascar INTRODUCTION The genus Miniopterus appears to have been reported initially from Madagascar by Dobson (1878) who listed smaller specimens as M. scotinus and larger examples as M. schreibersii. Subsequently Thomas (1906) also recognised two distinct Madagascan species, describing the smaller as M. manavi and larger as M. majori. Dorst (1947 a, b) discussed and keyed these, distinguishing them by the size difference to which Thomas (loc. cit.) had drawn attention, while Harrison (1953) compared them in some detail. Currently (Hayman and Hill 1971, Juste and Ibanez 1992) manavi is considered to be a subspecies of the African M. minor, and majori is similarly referred to the widely distributed M. schreibersii. Harrison (1959) described a further insular subspecies from the region, M. minor griveaudi, from Grand Comoro (= Angazija) Island. The holotypes of manavi and majori were selected from a small series of specimens (BM(NH) 97.9.1.37-44) in the collections of The Natural History Museum, London [formerly the British Museum (Natural History)], comprising five of the former and three of the latter, obtained by Dr. C.I. Forsyth Major. However, in 1976 the osteological collections of the Museum were found to include a further extensive series of specimens of Madagascan Miniopterus http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mammalia - International Journal of the Systematics, Biology and Ecology of Mammals de Gruyter

Long-fingered bats of the genus Miniopterus (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae) from Madagascar

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0025-1461
eISSN
1864-1547
DOI
10.1515/mamm.1993.57.3.401
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTION The genus Miniopterus appears to have been reported initially from Madagascar by Dobson (1878) who listed smaller specimens as M. scotinus and larger examples as M. schreibersii. Subsequently Thomas (1906) also recognised two distinct Madagascan species, describing the smaller as M. manavi and larger as M. majori. Dorst (1947 a, b) discussed and keyed these, distinguishing them by the size difference to which Thomas (loc. cit.) had drawn attention, while Harrison (1953) compared them in some detail. Currently (Hayman and Hill 1971, Juste and Ibanez 1992) manavi is considered to be a subspecies of the African M. minor, and majori is similarly referred to the widely distributed M. schreibersii. Harrison (1959) described a further insular subspecies from the region, M. minor griveaudi, from Grand Comoro (= Angazija) Island. The holotypes of manavi and majori were selected from a small series of specimens (BM(NH) 97.9.1.37-44) in the collections of The Natural History Museum, London [formerly the British Museum (Natural History)], comprising five of the former and three of the latter, obtained by Dr. C.I. Forsyth Major. However, in 1976 the osteological collections of the Museum were found to include a further extensive series of specimens of Madagascan Miniopterus

Journal

Mammalia - International Journal of the Systematics, Biology and Ecology of Mammalsde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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