Limited definiteness of ‘God’ in Spinoza’s System. Answer to Heine Siebrand

Limited definiteness of ‘God’ in Spinoza’s System. Answer to Heine Siebrand Prof. Dr. Arne N a e s s , Institutt for Filosofi, Postboks 1116, Blindem, Oslo3, Norway 1. Every key term of every great philosopher is under continuous study. The philosophers may have been fairly clear äs to how to use their key terms, but only in relation to a particular frame of reference, and including only a limit area of problems. And each Interpretation becomes, in time, less and less understandable, partly because of the steady change of meanings of words. The definiens formulations of definitions are no exceptions. Moreover, philosophers often do not obey their own explicit definitions; or the relation between the definitions and the applications is obscure and difficult to understand. When philosophers express their agreement or disagreement with each other it is clear that they profit from taking the key terms in slightly or astonishingly different meanings from those of their authors. If they are contemporaries, mutual complaints are very common. These remarks are written without bitterness because language is basically indefinite. Intensified study and carefulness in criticism of each other's texts cannot change the fundamental indefiniteness without which language could not possibly function in live communication. The term Deus in the Ethics http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neue Zeitschrift für Systematische Theologie und Religionsphilosophie de Gruyter

Limited definiteness of ‘God’ in Spinoza’s System. Answer to Heine Siebrand

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0028-3517
eISSN
1612-9520
D.O.I.
10.1515/nzst.1986.28.2.275
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Prof. Dr. Arne N a e s s , Institutt for Filosofi, Postboks 1116, Blindem, Oslo3, Norway 1. Every key term of every great philosopher is under continuous study. The philosophers may have been fairly clear äs to how to use their key terms, but only in relation to a particular frame of reference, and including only a limit area of problems. And each Interpretation becomes, in time, less and less understandable, partly because of the steady change of meanings of words. The definiens formulations of definitions are no exceptions. Moreover, philosophers often do not obey their own explicit definitions; or the relation between the definitions and the applications is obscure and difficult to understand. When philosophers express their agreement or disagreement with each other it is clear that they profit from taking the key terms in slightly or astonishingly different meanings from those of their authors. If they are contemporaries, mutual complaints are very common. These remarks are written without bitterness because language is basically indefinite. Intensified study and carefulness in criticism of each other's texts cannot change the fundamental indefiniteness without which language could not possibly function in live communication. The term Deus in the Ethics

Journal

Neue Zeitschrift für Systematische Theologie und Religionsphilosophiede Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1986

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