Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Language, identity, and insider/outsider positionality in Caribbean Creole English research

Language, identity, and insider/outsider positionality in Caribbean Creole English research Abstract This article is a critically reflexive interrogation of the researcher’s identity with respect to qualitative language research in her own community, illustrated by discourse analysis of three vignettes from a critical ethnographic study of language education policy in Jamaica. Drawing on her biography as well as poststructuralist theories and research on identity and positioning, the author discusses the ways in which the choice, process, and (re)presentation of her research on Caribbean Creole English speakers in schools are filtered through the tensions among her ascribed, felt, and evolving insider/outsider identities and positionings. These tensions are heightened due to the highly charged and paradoxical nature of creole language politics, particularly with regard to education. Implications of such tensions for qualitative research in applied linguistics are also addressed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Linguistics Review de Gruyter

Language, identity, and insider/outsider positionality in Caribbean Creole English research

Applied Linguistics Review , Volume 6 (3) – Sep 1, 2015

Loading next page...
 
/lp/de-gruyter/language-identity-and-insider-outsider-positionality-in-caribbean-TJieKgQnEl
Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by the
ISSN
1868-6303
eISSN
1868-6311
DOI
10.1515/applirev-2015-0016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract This article is a critically reflexive interrogation of the researcher’s identity with respect to qualitative language research in her own community, illustrated by discourse analysis of three vignettes from a critical ethnographic study of language education policy in Jamaica. Drawing on her biography as well as poststructuralist theories and research on identity and positioning, the author discusses the ways in which the choice, process, and (re)presentation of her research on Caribbean Creole English speakers in schools are filtered through the tensions among her ascribed, felt, and evolving insider/outsider identities and positionings. These tensions are heightened due to the highly charged and paradoxical nature of creole language politics, particularly with regard to education. Implications of such tensions for qualitative research in applied linguistics are also addressed.

Journal

Applied Linguistics Reviewde Gruyter

Published: Sep 1, 2015

References