Is high-altitude mountaineering Russian roulette?

Is high-altitude mountaineering Russian roulette? AbstractWhether the nature of the risks associated with climbing high-altitude (8000 m) peaks is in some sense “controllable” is a longstanding debate in the mountaineering community. Well-known mountaineers David Roberts and Ed Viesturs explore this issue in their recent memoirs. Roberts views the primary risks as “objective” or uncontrollable, whereas Viesturs maintains that experience and attention to safety can make a significant difference. This study sheds light on the Roberts-Viesturs debate using a comprehensive dataset of climbing on Nepalese Himalayan peaks. To test whether the data is consistent with a constant failure rate model (Roberts) or a decreasing failure rate model (Viesturs), it draws on Total Time on Test (TTT) plots from the reliability engineering literature and applies graphical inference techniques to them. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Quantitative Analysis in Sports de Gruyter

Is high-altitude mountaineering Russian roulette?

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
©2013 by Walter de Gruyter Berlin Boston
ISSN
1559-0410
eISSN
1559-0410
DOI
10.1515/jqas-2012-0038
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractWhether the nature of the risks associated with climbing high-altitude (8000 m) peaks is in some sense “controllable” is a longstanding debate in the mountaineering community. Well-known mountaineers David Roberts and Ed Viesturs explore this issue in their recent memoirs. Roberts views the primary risks as “objective” or uncontrollable, whereas Viesturs maintains that experience and attention to safety can make a significant difference. This study sheds light on the Roberts-Viesturs debate using a comprehensive dataset of climbing on Nepalese Himalayan peaks. To test whether the data is consistent with a constant failure rate model (Roberts) or a decreasing failure rate model (Viesturs), it draws on Total Time on Test (TTT) plots from the reliability engineering literature and applies graphical inference techniques to them.

Journal

Journal of Quantitative Analysis in Sportsde Gruyter

Published: Mar 30, 2013

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