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Intestinal flora in breast- and bottle-fed infants

Intestinal flora in breast- and bottle-fed infants Rubaltelli et al., Fecal flora in newborns Original articles J. Perinat. Med. 26 (1998) 186-191 Firmino F. Rubaltelli1, Roberto Biadaioli1, Patrizia Pecile2, and Pierluigi Nicoletti2 division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, laboratory of Microbiology and Virology. Careggi University Hospital and University of Florence, School of Medicine, Florence, Italy 1 Introduction The association between diet and fecal flora in newborn infants still deserves attention. In fact, although most of the literature dealing with the subject accepts the premise that a difference exists between the quality of fecal flora found in breastfed and bottle-fed infants [1, 25], infant formulas have been extensively modified in recent years. Secondly, compared to formula-fed infants, breastfeeding provides greater resistance to enteral and systemic disorders caused by bacterial pathogens commonly found in the human intestinal environment [33]. The predominance of bifidobacteria found in breast-fed infants appears to promote substantial protection against this type of infection [3,14,20]. However, it is difficult to establish which dietary component is responsible for the differences in intestinal microflora found in bottle and breast-fed infants examined at the in vivo level. It is possible that some oligosaccharides present in human milk play an important role on this matter. The aim of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Perinatal Medicine de Gruyter

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0300-5577
eISSN
1619-3997
DOI
10.1515/jpme.1998.26.3.186
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Rubaltelli et al., Fecal flora in newborns Original articles J. Perinat. Med. 26 (1998) 186-191 Firmino F. Rubaltelli1, Roberto Biadaioli1, Patrizia Pecile2, and Pierluigi Nicoletti2 division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, laboratory of Microbiology and Virology. Careggi University Hospital and University of Florence, School of Medicine, Florence, Italy 1 Introduction The association between diet and fecal flora in newborn infants still deserves attention. In fact, although most of the literature dealing with the subject accepts the premise that a difference exists between the quality of fecal flora found in breastfed and bottle-fed infants [1, 25], infant formulas have been extensively modified in recent years. Secondly, compared to formula-fed infants, breastfeeding provides greater resistance to enteral and systemic disorders caused by bacterial pathogens commonly found in the human intestinal environment [33]. The predominance of bifidobacteria found in breast-fed infants appears to promote substantial protection against this type of infection [3,14,20]. However, it is difficult to establish which dietary component is responsible for the differences in intestinal microflora found in bottle and breast-fed infants examined at the in vivo level. It is possible that some oligosaccharides present in human milk play an important role on this matter. The aim of

Journal

Journal of Perinatal Medicinede Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1998

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