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Intertextual practices in academic writing by Chinese ESL students

Intertextual practices in academic writing by Chinese ESL students Abstract In light of the increase of international graduate students, the dynamics of higher education in English speaking countries have changed dramatically coupled with an obvious gap between native English speaking (NES) and English as second language (ESL) graduate students in terms of their academic literacy. As a key component of academic literacy, academic writing consists of noticeable differences between these two cohorts of students. Against the backdrop of ongoing attention to the process and practice of academic writing, this study examines Chinese ESL graduate students’ intertextual practices in composing their academic writing, especially, when the students newly arrived in an English speaking world. Intertextual practice in this study is concerned about not only the transgressive intertextual practice or plagiarism behaviours, but how Chinese ESL students draw on external sources in developing their own writing. This study shows that the most salient feature in the intertextual practice of the participants is the use of indirect quotes rather than syntheses in their own words, and most of the external sources are used to introduce new beliefs, ideas, or issues to their writing. In addition, this study explores possible factors that mediate these practices in consideration of the linguistic and sociocultural backgrounds of the Chinese ESL students. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Linguistics Review de Gruyter

Intertextual practices in academic writing by Chinese ESL students

Applied Linguistics Review , Volume 7 (1) – Mar 1, 2016

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by the
ISSN
1868-6303
eISSN
1868-6311
DOI
10.1515/applirev-2016-0003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In light of the increase of international graduate students, the dynamics of higher education in English speaking countries have changed dramatically coupled with an obvious gap between native English speaking (NES) and English as second language (ESL) graduate students in terms of their academic literacy. As a key component of academic literacy, academic writing consists of noticeable differences between these two cohorts of students. Against the backdrop of ongoing attention to the process and practice of academic writing, this study examines Chinese ESL graduate students’ intertextual practices in composing their academic writing, especially, when the students newly arrived in an English speaking world. Intertextual practice in this study is concerned about not only the transgressive intertextual practice or plagiarism behaviours, but how Chinese ESL students draw on external sources in developing their own writing. This study shows that the most salient feature in the intertextual practice of the participants is the use of indirect quotes rather than syntheses in their own words, and most of the external sources are used to introduce new beliefs, ideas, or issues to their writing. In addition, this study explores possible factors that mediate these practices in consideration of the linguistic and sociocultural backgrounds of the Chinese ESL students.

Journal

Applied Linguistics Reviewde Gruyter

Published: Mar 1, 2016

References