Interpretations of the 14 C Method of Measuring the Total Annual Production of Phytoplankton in a South Carolina Estuary

Interpretations of the 14 C Method of Measuring the Total Annual Production of Phytoplankton in a... Introduction The application of the 14C method (Steemann-Nielsen 1952) for the measurement of phytoplanktonic primary production rates is routine in laboratories and field studies globally. However, criticisms of the method are numerous (Fogg 1969, Morris et al 1971, Strickland 1965). In recent years, measurements of the carbon content of the medium in which the cells are suspended have enhanced the confusion already associated with the 14 C technique (Anderson and Zeutschel 1970, Arthur and Rigler 1967, Nalewajko and Lean 1972, Schindler 1971, Schindler and Holmgren 1971, Thomas 1971, Williams et al 1972). Large amounts of carbon have been observed in the filtrates of 14C-labelled natural samples (Table i). Inshore, *) This paper is contribution No. 128 of the Belle W. Baruch Institute for Marine Biology and Coastal Research. Botanica Marina / Vol. XIX / 1976 / Fase. 2 productive areas generally have high production rates with low percentages of fixed carbon released to the surrounding medium, while oligotrophic areas are characterized by low total fixation rates with high percentages of extracellular carbon (Anderson and Zeutschel 1970, Fogg et al 1965, Thomas 1971, Watt 1966). Further, annual differences in the release of organic matter from phytoplankton have also been http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Botanica Marina de Gruyter

Interpretations of the 14 C Method of Measuring the Total Annual Production of Phytoplankton in a South Carolina Estuary

Botanica Marina, Volume 19 (2) – Jan 1, 1976

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0006-8055
eISSN
1437-4323
DOI
10.1515/botm.1976.19.2.119
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction The application of the 14C method (Steemann-Nielsen 1952) for the measurement of phytoplanktonic primary production rates is routine in laboratories and field studies globally. However, criticisms of the method are numerous (Fogg 1969, Morris et al 1971, Strickland 1965). In recent years, measurements of the carbon content of the medium in which the cells are suspended have enhanced the confusion already associated with the 14 C technique (Anderson and Zeutschel 1970, Arthur and Rigler 1967, Nalewajko and Lean 1972, Schindler 1971, Schindler and Holmgren 1971, Thomas 1971, Williams et al 1972). Large amounts of carbon have been observed in the filtrates of 14C-labelled natural samples (Table i). Inshore, *) This paper is contribution No. 128 of the Belle W. Baruch Institute for Marine Biology and Coastal Research. Botanica Marina / Vol. XIX / 1976 / Fase. 2 productive areas generally have high production rates with low percentages of fixed carbon released to the surrounding medium, while oligotrophic areas are characterized by low total fixation rates with high percentages of extracellular carbon (Anderson and Zeutschel 1970, Fogg et al 1965, Thomas 1971, Watt 1966). Further, annual differences in the release of organic matter from phytoplankton have also been

Journal

Botanica Marinade Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1976

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