Idiopathic environmental intolerance

Idiopathic environmental intolerance Rev Environ Health 2015; 30(4): 207 Editorial David O. Carpenter* and Dominique Belpomme DOI 10.1515/reveh-2015-0065 This issue of Reviews on Environmental Health consists of invited papers on several syndromes of uncertain etiology but ones that pose serious and severe debilitation and interference with quality of life for those affected. Often in aggregate called "idiopathic environmental intolerance" they include electromagnetic hypersensitivity, multiple chemical sensitivity, chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, Gulf War illness and likely some others less well defined. All have in common fatigue, pain (especially headaches and joint and muscle pain), often altered cognitive function, cardiac problems, and impaired mobility and balance. Often, but not always, some specific event or exposure triggers the initiation of the syndrome. Because the symptoms are relatively non-specific, patients may unfortunately be referred to psychiatric rather than medical care. There are few effective treatments other than reducing exposure to triggering environmental factors. There is increasing world-wide awareness that these are real diseases that affect a significant percentage of the population, but still attract significant controversy. We hope that these peerreviewed publications will not only stimulate awareness of the problem but also stimulate science-based research on treatment regimens for symptomatic relief and reversal of the disease processes. All of these pathologic disorders should be recognized by the scientific and medical communities and international health institutions. This issue presents state-of-the-art reviews of the scientific advances in the pathophysiologic understanding of these disorders for medical practitioners and research scientists. *Corresponding author: David O. Carpenter, Institute for Health and the Environment, University at Albany, 5 University Pl., Rm. A217, Rensselaer, NY 12144, USA, E-mail: dcarpenter@albany.edu Dominique Belpomme: European Cancer and Environment Research Institute, Brussels, Belgium http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews on Environmental Health de Gruyter

Idiopathic environmental intolerance

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by the
ISSN
0048-7554
eISSN
2191-0308
DOI
10.1515/reveh-2015-0065
pmid
26613324
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Rev Environ Health 2015; 30(4): 207 Editorial David O. Carpenter* and Dominique Belpomme DOI 10.1515/reveh-2015-0065 This issue of Reviews on Environmental Health consists of invited papers on several syndromes of uncertain etiology but ones that pose serious and severe debilitation and interference with quality of life for those affected. Often in aggregate called "idiopathic environmental intolerance" they include electromagnetic hypersensitivity, multiple chemical sensitivity, chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, Gulf War illness and likely some others less well defined. All have in common fatigue, pain (especially headaches and joint and muscle pain), often altered cognitive function, cardiac problems, and impaired mobility and balance. Often, but not always, some specific event or exposure triggers the initiation of the syndrome. Because the symptoms are relatively non-specific, patients may unfortunately be referred to psychiatric rather than medical care. There are few effective treatments other than reducing exposure to triggering environmental factors. There is increasing world-wide awareness that these are real diseases that affect a significant percentage of the population, but still attract significant controversy. We hope that these peerreviewed publications will not only stimulate awareness of the problem but also stimulate science-based research on treatment regimens for symptomatic relief and reversal of the disease processes. All of these pathologic disorders should be recognized by the scientific and medical communities and international health institutions. This issue presents state-of-the-art reviews of the scientific advances in the pathophysiologic understanding of these disorders for medical practitioners and research scientists. *Corresponding author: David O. Carpenter, Institute for Health and the Environment, University at Albany, 5 University Pl., Rm. A217, Rensselaer, NY 12144, USA, E-mail: dcarpenter@albany.edu Dominique Belpomme: European Cancer and Environment Research Institute, Brussels, Belgium

Journal

Reviews on Environmental Healthde Gruyter

Published: Dec 1, 2015

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