Humor(lessness) elucidated – Sense of humor in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Review and Introduction

Humor(lessness) elucidated – Sense of humor in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders:... DOI 10.1515/humor-2013-0027 Humor 2013; 26(3): 393­409 Keywords: humor, laughter, positive psychology, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Asperger's syndrome Andrea Samson: Department of Psychology, Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Bldg 420, Stanford, CA, 94305. E-mail: andrea.samson@stanford.edu 1Introduction Humor is a crucial component in many different contexts of everyday life. Humor can be seen as social "glue" that helps to foster relationships, it relates to positive functioning, enhances quality of life, and is important for life satisfaction (see Martin 2007; Ruch 2008). Humor has adaptive functions, as have been shown in numerous studies of humor's impact on inter-personal relationships and intrapersonal emotional functioning. However, there seems to be a population that encounters difficulties with humor. In 1944, Hans Asperger described humorlessness to be one of the characteristics of individuals with Asperger's syndrome (AS) or ­ in a broader sense ­ individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD): An essential characteristic of these children is their humorlessness. They do not understand jokes, especially when they are targeted at themselves.... They are unable to be cheerful in a relaxed manner and do not understand the world in a peaceful way which is the basis of genuine humor. If they are occasionally in a cheerful mood, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Humor: International Journal of Humor Research de Gruyter

Humor(lessness) elucidated – Sense of humor in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Review and Introduction

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by the
ISSN
0933-1719
eISSN
1613-3722
DOI
10.1515/humor-2013-0027
Publisher site
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Abstract

DOI 10.1515/humor-2013-0027 Humor 2013; 26(3): 393­409 Keywords: humor, laughter, positive psychology, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Asperger's syndrome Andrea Samson: Department of Psychology, Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Bldg 420, Stanford, CA, 94305. E-mail: andrea.samson@stanford.edu 1Introduction Humor is a crucial component in many different contexts of everyday life. Humor can be seen as social "glue" that helps to foster relationships, it relates to positive functioning, enhances quality of life, and is important for life satisfaction (see Martin 2007; Ruch 2008). Humor has adaptive functions, as have been shown in numerous studies of humor's impact on inter-personal relationships and intrapersonal emotional functioning. However, there seems to be a population that encounters difficulties with humor. In 1944, Hans Asperger described humorlessness to be one of the characteristics of individuals with Asperger's syndrome (AS) or ­ in a broader sense ­ individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD): An essential characteristic of these children is their humorlessness. They do not understand jokes, especially when they are targeted at themselves.... They are unable to be cheerful in a relaxed manner and do not understand the world in a peaceful way which is the basis of genuine humor. If they are occasionally in a cheerful mood,

Journal

Humor: International Journal of Humor Researchde Gruyter

Published: Jul 12, 2013

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