Hounded Women: The IPV Protocol and the Autonomy of Abuse Victims

Hounded Women: The IPV Protocol and the Autonomy of Abuse Victims AbstractIn the early 90s, many jurisdictions adopted a special protocol in an effort to stop and punish intimate partner abuse. This article focuses on the particular form this policy has taken in the New York County jurisdiction, as it is a source of deep disagreement among feminists. In this article, I explore this disagreement in order to demonstrate two things. First, that like many other contentious issues, this controversy revolves around the question of how oppressed individuals’ autonomy should be conceived. Second, that a structural understanding of autonomy, such as the one pioneered by the philosopher Joseph Raz, can be of great use to resolve disagreements on this protocol. I offer an interpretation of his account which enables us to acknowledge the agency of ‘hounded women’ while legitimizing interventions aimed at eradicating the coercion they are victims of. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Moral Philosophy and Politics de Gruyter

Hounded Women: The IPV Protocol and the Autonomy of Abuse Victims

Moral Philosophy and Politics, Volume 4 (1): 19 – Jun 27, 2017

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2017 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston
ISSN
2194-5616
eISSN
2194-5624
DOI
10.1515/mopp-2016-0039
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractIn the early 90s, many jurisdictions adopted a special protocol in an effort to stop and punish intimate partner abuse. This article focuses on the particular form this policy has taken in the New York County jurisdiction, as it is a source of deep disagreement among feminists. In this article, I explore this disagreement in order to demonstrate two things. First, that like many other contentious issues, this controversy revolves around the question of how oppressed individuals’ autonomy should be conceived. Second, that a structural understanding of autonomy, such as the one pioneered by the philosopher Joseph Raz, can be of great use to resolve disagreements on this protocol. I offer an interpretation of his account which enables us to acknowledge the agency of ‘hounded women’ while legitimizing interventions aimed at eradicating the coercion they are victims of.

Journal

Moral Philosophy and Politicsde Gruyter

Published: Jun 27, 2017

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