Growth Hormone Response to GHRH During Lifespan

Growth Hormone Response to GHRH During Lifespan E.E. Müller1, D. Cocchi2, E. Ghigo3, E. Arvat3, V. Locatelli1 and F. Camanni3 department of Pharmacology, University of Milan, department of Pharmaco-Biology, division of Endocrinology, Department of Clinical Pathophysiology, University ofBari, Italy SYNOPSIS Recent evidence has shown that growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) enables investigation of the pathophysiology of GH secretion in a variety of different states, but it cannot be used as a test for probing pituitaiy somatotrophic function, due to the extreme inter- and intra-subject variability in normal subjects. This task is better accomplished when compounds which deprive the pituitaiy of inhibitoiy (somatostatinergic) influences, e.g. pyridostigmine, arginine, etc., are given in combination with GHRH. Administration of GHRH in both animals and humans reveals a state of GH hyperresponsiveness in the immediate postnatal period, which is likely to be due to a reduced pituitaiy sensitivity to somatostatin. GH responses to GHRH are relatively constant throughout the different stages of pubertal development, though further studies are needed to confirm these findings, and decline after the third-fourth decade in men, after menopause in women. It is apparent that during aging the releasable pool of GH is preserved and that impaired GH secretion is due to defective hypothalamic GHRH function and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism de Gruyter

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 by the
ISSN
0334-018X
eISSN
2191-0251
DOI
10.1515/JPEM.1993.6.1.5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

E.E. Müller1, D. Cocchi2, E. Ghigo3, E. Arvat3, V. Locatelli1 and F. Camanni3 department of Pharmacology, University of Milan, department of Pharmaco-Biology, division of Endocrinology, Department of Clinical Pathophysiology, University ofBari, Italy SYNOPSIS Recent evidence has shown that growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) enables investigation of the pathophysiology of GH secretion in a variety of different states, but it cannot be used as a test for probing pituitaiy somatotrophic function, due to the extreme inter- and intra-subject variability in normal subjects. This task is better accomplished when compounds which deprive the pituitaiy of inhibitoiy (somatostatinergic) influences, e.g. pyridostigmine, arginine, etc., are given in combination with GHRH. Administration of GHRH in both animals and humans reveals a state of GH hyperresponsiveness in the immediate postnatal period, which is likely to be due to a reduced pituitaiy sensitivity to somatostatin. GH responses to GHRH are relatively constant throughout the different stages of pubertal development, though further studies are needed to confirm these findings, and decline after the third-fourth decade in men, after menopause in women. It is apparent that during aging the releasable pool of GH is preserved and that impaired GH secretion is due to defective hypothalamic GHRH function and

Journal

Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolismde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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