Gaur ( Bos gaurus ) and Banteng ( B. javanicus ) in the lowland forest mosaic of Xe Pian Protected Area, Lao PDR: abundance, habitat use, and conservation

Gaur ( Bos gaurus ) and Banteng ( B. javanicus ) in the lowland forest mosaic of Xe Pian... Gaur ( Bos gaurus ) and banteng ( Bos javanicus ) populations throughout South-east Asia have declined severely because of hunting and habitat fragmentation. Important remnant populations persist in Xe Pian national protected area in southern Lao P.D.R., where sign-based surveys were carried out between 1996 and 1998 to determine their distribution, abundance, and patterns of habitat use. Xe Pian is comprised of a largely intact lowland mosaic of semi-evergreen, mixed deciduous, and dry dipterocarp forest types. Gaur used a broader diversity of these habitat types than banteng, attaining moderate densities in homogeneous semi-evergreen forest as well as expanses of deciduous dipterocarp and mixed deciduous forests. Mixed deciduous forest was the least abundant forest type but was commonly used by gaur. Banteng showed a strong affiliation with drier and more open habitats, especially dry dipterocarp forest, despite increased vulnerability to hunting in these areas in the past. Banteng were not found within large expanses of semi-evergreen forest. Their distribution within Xe Pian was therefore more restricted than gaur, though they were relatively more numerous within two isolated corners of the protected area. Signs of calves and juveniles indicated that both species retained breeding populations in Xe Pian. Remaining herds were small – composed of two to five individuals – but bamboo understories in semi-evergreen forest were a food source that attracted larger congregations of gaur in the rainy season. The banteng population in Xe Pian is globally significant for conservation, while that of gaur is nationally significant. The existence of extensive high quality habitat and on-going collaboration of local people lends hope that Xe Pian's wild cattle will increase, given protection from hunting. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mammalia de Gruyter

Gaur ( Bos gaurus ) and Banteng ( B. javanicus ) in the lowland forest mosaic of Xe Pian Protected Area, Lao PDR: abundance, habitat use, and conservation

Mammalia, Volume 68 – Oct 1, 2004

Loading next page...
 
/lp/de-gruyter/gaur-bos-gaurus-and-banteng-b-javanicus-in-the-lowland-forest-mosaic-sBVOdV9coq
Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by the
ISSN
0025-1461
eISSN
1864-1547
D.O.I.
10.1515/mamm.2004.015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Gaur ( Bos gaurus ) and banteng ( Bos javanicus ) populations throughout South-east Asia have declined severely because of hunting and habitat fragmentation. Important remnant populations persist in Xe Pian national protected area in southern Lao P.D.R., where sign-based surveys were carried out between 1996 and 1998 to determine their distribution, abundance, and patterns of habitat use. Xe Pian is comprised of a largely intact lowland mosaic of semi-evergreen, mixed deciduous, and dry dipterocarp forest types. Gaur used a broader diversity of these habitat types than banteng, attaining moderate densities in homogeneous semi-evergreen forest as well as expanses of deciduous dipterocarp and mixed deciduous forests. Mixed deciduous forest was the least abundant forest type but was commonly used by gaur. Banteng showed a strong affiliation with drier and more open habitats, especially dry dipterocarp forest, despite increased vulnerability to hunting in these areas in the past. Banteng were not found within large expanses of semi-evergreen forest. Their distribution within Xe Pian was therefore more restricted than gaur, though they were relatively more numerous within two isolated corners of the protected area. Signs of calves and juveniles indicated that both species retained breeding populations in Xe Pian. Remaining herds were small – composed of two to five individuals – but bamboo understories in semi-evergreen forest were a food source that attracted larger congregations of gaur in the rainy season. The banteng population in Xe Pian is globally significant for conservation, while that of gaur is nationally significant. The existence of extensive high quality habitat and on-going collaboration of local people lends hope that Xe Pian's wild cattle will increase, given protection from hunting.

Journal

Mammaliade Gruyter

Published: Oct 1, 2004

Keywords: bovidae,; Mammalia,; Lao PDR,; ecology,; conservation

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off