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Ethics revisited: Rights, responsibilities and relationships in online research

Ethics revisited: Rights, responsibilities and relationships in online research Applied Linguistics Review 2017; 8(2-3): 315­320 Postscript * DOI 10.1515/applirev-2016-1043 The papers in this Special Issue were first presented at the `Ethics of Online Research Methods' workshop for the British Association of Applied Linguistics Special Interest Group for Language and New Media held at Cardiff University, April 2015. The workshop was in part a response to the increasing complexity that `new media' poses for ethical-decision making in applied linguistics. The Guidelines for Good Practice developed by the British Association for Applied Linguistics pre-dated the mainstream uptake of social media and other kinds of digital communication, being first published in 1994 and then revised in 2006. They have only now been updated again in a way that could take into account the changing mediascape (BAAL 2016). The scale and scope of what might be considered `new media' continue to grow, to the point where social network sites boast millions of members and archives of online interactions are sizeable. On the one hand, this communicative landscape appears to open up many opportunities for empirical research in applied linguistics, ranging from large scale corpus-based projects to smaller scale ethnographic explorations of digital literacy practices. On the other hand, the rights to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Linguistics Review de Gruyter

Ethics revisited: Rights, responsibilities and relationships in online research

Applied Linguistics Review , Volume 8 – May 24, 2017

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by the
ISSN
1868-6303
eISSN
1868-6311
DOI
10.1515/applirev-2016-1043
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Applied Linguistics Review 2017; 8(2-3): 315­320 Postscript * DOI 10.1515/applirev-2016-1043 The papers in this Special Issue were first presented at the `Ethics of Online Research Methods' workshop for the British Association of Applied Linguistics Special Interest Group for Language and New Media held at Cardiff University, April 2015. The workshop was in part a response to the increasing complexity that `new media' poses for ethical-decision making in applied linguistics. The Guidelines for Good Practice developed by the British Association for Applied Linguistics pre-dated the mainstream uptake of social media and other kinds of digital communication, being first published in 1994 and then revised in 2006. They have only now been updated again in a way that could take into account the changing mediascape (BAAL 2016). The scale and scope of what might be considered `new media' continue to grow, to the point where social network sites boast millions of members and archives of online interactions are sizeable. On the one hand, this communicative landscape appears to open up many opportunities for empirical research in applied linguistics, ranging from large scale corpus-based projects to smaller scale ethnographic explorations of digital literacy practices. On the other hand, the rights to

Journal

Applied Linguistics Reviewde Gruyter

Published: May 24, 2017

References