Electroviscous Effect in Porous Polystyrene Plugs

Electroviscous Effect in Porous Polystyrene Plugs Abstract The disagreement between the experimentally determined hydrodynamic coefficients GL IJL ) of the poly styrene/methanol-water (50% v/v) mixture for different electrolyte concentrations, and those predicted by the classical treatment of Overbeek [1], is explained on basis of an electro viscous effect. Introduction The presence of an electrical double layer around the colloidal particles that form a porous plug exerts a profound influence on the flow behaviour of the fluid that crosses the plug [2]. All such influences are grouped together under the name electro viscous effects. For steady flow under an applied pressure gradient (in the absence of an externally applied electric field) an induced streaming potential gradient will be established [3]. This potential will produce a backflow of liquid by the electroosmotic effect, and the net effect is a diminished flow in the forward direction. The volumetric flow rate will be reduced, which will result in an apparent viscosity higher than that shown by the liquid phase in the absence of double-layer effects (e.g., at high salt concentration). This distortion of the electrical double layer implies an energy dissipation mechanism called the primary electroviscous effect, which manifests itself as an increased viscosity of the suspension. At http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics de Gruyter

Electroviscous Effect in Porous Polystyrene Plugs

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0340-0204
eISSN
1437-4358
DOI
10.1515/jnet.1993.18.2.195
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The disagreement between the experimentally determined hydrodynamic coefficients GL IJL ) of the poly styrene/methanol-water (50% v/v) mixture for different electrolyte concentrations, and those predicted by the classical treatment of Overbeek [1], is explained on basis of an electro viscous effect. Introduction The presence of an electrical double layer around the colloidal particles that form a porous plug exerts a profound influence on the flow behaviour of the fluid that crosses the plug [2]. All such influences are grouped together under the name electro viscous effects. For steady flow under an applied pressure gradient (in the absence of an externally applied electric field) an induced streaming potential gradient will be established [3]. This potential will produce a backflow of liquid by the electroosmotic effect, and the net effect is a diminished flow in the forward direction. The volumetric flow rate will be reduced, which will result in an apparent viscosity higher than that shown by the liquid phase in the absence of double-layer effects (e.g., at high salt concentration). This distortion of the electrical double layer implies an energy dissipation mechanism called the primary electroviscous effect, which manifests itself as an increased viscosity of the suspension. At

Journal

Journal of Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamicsde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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