Effect of Polyborate Pre-treatment on the Shear Strength Development of Phenolic Resin to Sitka Spruce Bonds

Effect of Polyborate Pre-treatment on the Shear Strength Development of Phenolic Resin to Sitka... Introduction As markets for wood-based composite products expand, these materials will be increasingly used under conditions conducive to fungal and insect attack. Assembled panels can be treated with conventional wood preservatives using pressure processes but the associated fluid uptake can lead to excessive swelling or delamination. Furthermore, treatment difficulties inherent with certain wood species can result in poor penetration of panels derived from them (Mitchoff 1990); this may lead to decay problems in service. As an alternative, veneers, flakes or particles may be preservative treated prior to being layed up, thus enabling quite uniformly treated panels to be produced. Either dipping or soaking methods may be used thereby avoiding the need for elaborate pressure treatment equipment. Boron, one potential chemical for this application, has excellent activity against fungi and insects in conditions where material is protected against continuous wetting (Carr 1959; Cockroft and Levy 1973). Boron compounds have several other advantages over conventional waterborne preservatives such as chromated copper arsenate (CCA), ammoniacal copper zinc arsenate (ACZA), and ammoniacal copper arsenate (ACA); for example, they readily diffuse through the wet heartwood of species such as Douglas-Fir which often resists chemical treatment. Factors such as a Holzforschung / Vol. 47 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Holzforschung - International Journal of the Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Technology of Wood de Gruyter

Effect of Polyborate Pre-treatment on the Shear Strength Development of Phenolic Resin to Sitka Spruce Bonds

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0018-3830
eISSN
1437-434X
DOI
10.1515/hfsg.1993.47.5.398
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction As markets for wood-based composite products expand, these materials will be increasingly used under conditions conducive to fungal and insect attack. Assembled panels can be treated with conventional wood preservatives using pressure processes but the associated fluid uptake can lead to excessive swelling or delamination. Furthermore, treatment difficulties inherent with certain wood species can result in poor penetration of panels derived from them (Mitchoff 1990); this may lead to decay problems in service. As an alternative, veneers, flakes or particles may be preservative treated prior to being layed up, thus enabling quite uniformly treated panels to be produced. Either dipping or soaking methods may be used thereby avoiding the need for elaborate pressure treatment equipment. Boron, one potential chemical for this application, has excellent activity against fungi and insects in conditions where material is protected against continuous wetting (Carr 1959; Cockroft and Levy 1973). Boron compounds have several other advantages over conventional waterborne preservatives such as chromated copper arsenate (CCA), ammoniacal copper zinc arsenate (ACZA), and ammoniacal copper arsenate (ACA); for example, they readily diffuse through the wet heartwood of species such as Douglas-Fir which often resists chemical treatment. Factors such as a Holzforschung / Vol. 47

Journal

Holzforschung - International Journal of the Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Technology of Woodde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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