Edible Seaweeds of Fiji: An Ethnobotanical Study

Edible Seaweeds of Fiji: An Ethnobotanical Study Abstract Seven taxa of seaweeds feature in the diet of native Fijians: Caulerpa racemosa, Caulerpa racemosa var. occidentalis, Codium bulbopilum, Hypnea pannosa, Gracilaria sp., Solieria robusta, and Acanthophora spicifera, with the preferred species being Caulerpa and Hypnea. A survey of the taxonomy and nomenclature of the edible species is provided, together with the Fijian names for the species, a description of harvesting, marketing and the socio-economic role of seaweeds in Fijian society. The harvesting, sale and consumption of edible seaweeds is almost exclusively an activity of women and girls from the native Fijian (Melanesian) population, and is organized through family and village groups in a cooperative manner. Seaweeds are regarded as a delicacy by the Fijians, who consume them using a variety of recipes, which are described. The volume and value of the crop is summarized for the period 1981-1991; up to 36 metric tonnes of seaweeds, valued at FJS50000 (US$32000) per annum are sold in Fijian Municipal Markets and other outlets. Introduction Chapman and Chapman (1980), Arasaki and Arasaki (1983), Abbott (1988) and Abbott and Cheney (1982) have reviewed the uses of seaweed for food. Virtually nothing, however, has been published about edible seaweeds in the South http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Botanica Marina de Gruyter

Edible Seaweeds of Fiji: An Ethnobotanical Study

Botanica Marina, Volume 36 (4) – Jan 1, 1993

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0006-8055
eISSN
1437-4323
DOI
10.1515/botm.1993.36.4.335
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Seven taxa of seaweeds feature in the diet of native Fijians: Caulerpa racemosa, Caulerpa racemosa var. occidentalis, Codium bulbopilum, Hypnea pannosa, Gracilaria sp., Solieria robusta, and Acanthophora spicifera, with the preferred species being Caulerpa and Hypnea. A survey of the taxonomy and nomenclature of the edible species is provided, together with the Fijian names for the species, a description of harvesting, marketing and the socio-economic role of seaweeds in Fijian society. The harvesting, sale and consumption of edible seaweeds is almost exclusively an activity of women and girls from the native Fijian (Melanesian) population, and is organized through family and village groups in a cooperative manner. Seaweeds are regarded as a delicacy by the Fijians, who consume them using a variety of recipes, which are described. The volume and value of the crop is summarized for the period 1981-1991; up to 36 metric tonnes of seaweeds, valued at FJS50000 (US$32000) per annum are sold in Fijian Municipal Markets and other outlets. Introduction Chapman and Chapman (1980), Arasaki and Arasaki (1983), Abbott (1988) and Abbott and Cheney (1982) have reviewed the uses of seaweed for food. Virtually nothing, however, has been published about edible seaweeds in the South

Journal

Botanica Marinade Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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