Desire and mortality

Desire and mortality Nietzsche on Luther and the need for God Since Emanuel Hirschs classic article Nietzsche und Luther quite a few studies have focused on Nietzsches changing valuations of the historical role of Martin Luther and the Reformation.1 As informative as these studies tend to be, they seldom pay sufficient attention to Nietzsche as philosopher and thus ignore the philosophical grounds of the fundamental disagreement Nietzsche came to have with Luther. I contend that it is well worth looking beyond Nietzsches bold, at times fantastical, interpretations of history, as these are hardly of any concern to contemporary philosophy.2 To complement accounts that focus on historical questions, I will analyze a decidedly philosophical note by Nietzsche, which has thus far been ignored in the discussion (NL 4[57], KSA 9, 113). This note, a commentary on a passage in Johann Julius Baumann's Handbuch der Moral, cuts to the heart of Nietzsche's philosophical opposition to Luther. Here is the note in its entirety: ,,(Baum 243) Luther: etwas haben, dem das menschliche Herz in Allem trauen könne d. h. einen Gott haben. Nach Thomas Aquinas braucht der Mensch wegen der Mängel, die er fühlt, einen Höheren, dem er sich unterordnet, und der ihm helfen http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nietzscheforschung de Gruyter

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by the
ISSN
1869-5604
eISSN
2191-9259
DOI
10.1515/nifo-2016-0107
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nietzsche on Luther and the need for God Since Emanuel Hirschs classic article Nietzsche und Luther quite a few studies have focused on Nietzsches changing valuations of the historical role of Martin Luther and the Reformation.1 As informative as these studies tend to be, they seldom pay sufficient attention to Nietzsche as philosopher and thus ignore the philosophical grounds of the fundamental disagreement Nietzsche came to have with Luther. I contend that it is well worth looking beyond Nietzsches bold, at times fantastical, interpretations of history, as these are hardly of any concern to contemporary philosophy.2 To complement accounts that focus on historical questions, I will analyze a decidedly philosophical note by Nietzsche, which has thus far been ignored in the discussion (NL 4[57], KSA 9, 113). This note, a commentary on a passage in Johann Julius Baumann's Handbuch der Moral, cuts to the heart of Nietzsche's philosophical opposition to Luther. Here is the note in its entirety: ,,(Baum 243) Luther: etwas haben, dem das menschliche Herz in Allem trauen könne d. h. einen Gott haben. Nach Thomas Aquinas braucht der Mensch wegen der Mängel, die er fühlt, einen Höheren, dem er sich unterordnet, und der ihm helfen

Journal

Nietzscheforschungde Gruyter

Published: Sep 12, 2016

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