Dental anomalies in five species of North American shrews

Dental anomalies in five species of North American shrews INTRODUCTION Dental anomalies occur in representative species from a variety of mammalian orders (Colyer 1936), although they have been reported to be fairly uncommon in soricids (Jackson 1928, Hall 1940). Dental anomalies in shrews have been described previously by several investigators (Meester 1959, Choate 1968, Dippenaar 1978), with a good introduction to past work provided by French (1985). Apart from intrinsic interest, genetically based dental anomalies are important as part of individual phenotypes Mammalia, t. 57, n° 1,1993. upon which natural selection operates (French 1985, Kvam 1985). Our objective was to determine the frequency of dental anomalies in five species of North American soricids: the northern short-tailed shrew (Blarina brevicauda); southern short-tailed shrew (B. carolinensis); least shrew (Cryptotis parva); southeastern shrew (Sorex longirostris); and pygmy shrew (S. [Microsorex] hoyi). MATERIALS AND METHODS Most of the southern short-tailed shrews were collected in pitfall traps from several sites in southern Illinois from March 1988 through May 1989 (see Gerard and Feldhamer 1990, for location and habitat types). Other southern short-tailed shrews were collected from Jackson County, Illinois, in pitfall traps or as incidental captures in Sherman live-traps. The remaining four species of shrews were collected from July 1989 through August http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mammalia - International Journal of the Systematics, Biology and Ecology of Mammals de Gruyter

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0025-1461
eISSN
1864-1547
DOI
10.1515/mamm.1993.57.1.115
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTION Dental anomalies occur in representative species from a variety of mammalian orders (Colyer 1936), although they have been reported to be fairly uncommon in soricids (Jackson 1928, Hall 1940). Dental anomalies in shrews have been described previously by several investigators (Meester 1959, Choate 1968, Dippenaar 1978), with a good introduction to past work provided by French (1985). Apart from intrinsic interest, genetically based dental anomalies are important as part of individual phenotypes Mammalia, t. 57, n° 1,1993. upon which natural selection operates (French 1985, Kvam 1985). Our objective was to determine the frequency of dental anomalies in five species of North American soricids: the northern short-tailed shrew (Blarina brevicauda); southern short-tailed shrew (B. carolinensis); least shrew (Cryptotis parva); southeastern shrew (Sorex longirostris); and pygmy shrew (S. [Microsorex] hoyi). MATERIALS AND METHODS Most of the southern short-tailed shrews were collected in pitfall traps from several sites in southern Illinois from March 1988 through May 1989 (see Gerard and Feldhamer 1990, for location and habitat types). Other southern short-tailed shrews were collected from Jackson County, Illinois, in pitfall traps or as incidental captures in Sherman live-traps. The remaining four species of shrews were collected from July 1989 through August

Journal

Mammalia - International Journal of the Systematics, Biology and Ecology of Mammalsde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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