Degradation of Cellulose by Sodium Borohydride

Degradation of Cellulose by Sodium Borohydride HOLZFORSCHUNG MITTEILUNGEN ZUR CHEMIE, PHYSIK, BIOLOGIE UND TECHNOLOGIE DES HOLZES 20. Band -- Heft 2 TECHNISCHER VERLAG HERBERT CRAM, BERLIN 30 HERAUSGEBER DR. G. STEGMANN, BRAUNSCHWEIG APRIL 1966 Theodor N. Kleinen**), Montreal Introduction Sodium borohydride is known to be a strongly reducing agent, and in this way to stabilize cellulosic materials by removing oxidized groups, especially keto groups (i, 2). In alkaline wood pulping, sodium borohydride was found to increase the pulp yield (3, 4) by stabilizing hemicelluloses. However, in alkaline cooking of cotton at 180° C with additions of sodium borohydride, cellulose degradation (5) was found to be more pronounced than that resulting from cooking the cotton at the same alkali Charge and temperature, but in absence of sodium borohydride. Furthermore, it was found that sodium borohydride reduction of a bleached high A-cellulose pulp even at room temperature (5) resulted in a significant viscosity decrease, and that this effect increased with increase of the sodium borohydride concentration. Experimental For elucidation, this phenomenon was studied on cotton linters with Variation of the time of the sodium borohydride treatment. The analytical data of the cotton linters were: «-cellulose 99.8%; pentosan 0.26%; asho.03%; Hägglund copper number 0.2; 0.5% cupriethylenediamine viscosity http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Holzforschung - International Journal of the Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Technology of Wood de Gruyter

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0018-3830
eISSN
1437-434X
DOI
10.1515/hfsg.1966.20.2.41
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

HOLZFORSCHUNG MITTEILUNGEN ZUR CHEMIE, PHYSIK, BIOLOGIE UND TECHNOLOGIE DES HOLZES 20. Band -- Heft 2 TECHNISCHER VERLAG HERBERT CRAM, BERLIN 30 HERAUSGEBER DR. G. STEGMANN, BRAUNSCHWEIG APRIL 1966 Theodor N. Kleinen**), Montreal Introduction Sodium borohydride is known to be a strongly reducing agent, and in this way to stabilize cellulosic materials by removing oxidized groups, especially keto groups (i, 2). In alkaline wood pulping, sodium borohydride was found to increase the pulp yield (3, 4) by stabilizing hemicelluloses. However, in alkaline cooking of cotton at 180° C with additions of sodium borohydride, cellulose degradation (5) was found to be more pronounced than that resulting from cooking the cotton at the same alkali Charge and temperature, but in absence of sodium borohydride. Furthermore, it was found that sodium borohydride reduction of a bleached high A-cellulose pulp even at room temperature (5) resulted in a significant viscosity decrease, and that this effect increased with increase of the sodium borohydride concentration. Experimental For elucidation, this phenomenon was studied on cotton linters with Variation of the time of the sodium borohydride treatment. The analytical data of the cotton linters were: «-cellulose 99.8%; pentosan 0.26%; asho.03%; Hägglund copper number 0.2; 0.5% cupriethylenediamine viscosity

Journal

Holzforschung - International Journal of the Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Technology of Woodde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1966

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