Culture Studies of Halodule wrightii Aschers. Edaphic Requirements

Culture Studies of Halodule wrightii Aschers. Edaphic Requirements Introduction Measurements of field conditions (Pulich 1982) revealed that sediment steady state pools of free H 2 S, acid-volatile sulfide (FeS), and water-soluble Fe and Mn correlated with growth of shoalgrass (Halodule wrightü Aschers.) into unvegetated Sediments. A positive correlation with shoalgrass production was found for sulfide (H2S or organic-SH) and Mn2+, while Fe appeared äs a negative edaphic factor when interstitial water concentrations exceeded l g Fe per ml. A buildup of low levels of sediment sulfide during Halodule colonization was postulated äs necessary to condition the Sediments and control soluble Fe (and other heavy metals) levels by complexing with Fe2+, thereby converting it to insoluble FeS. Excess sediment, soluble Fe2* may be potentially toxic to Halodule by similar mechanisms described for rice (Ponnamperuma 1955, Tanaka et al. 1968, Howeler 1973), sugar cane (Clements et al 1974), and various legumes (Ambler and Brown 1969, Brown and Jones 1977, Foy et al 1978). These studies have documented that excess Fe interferes with Mn, P, and K uptake and translocation, äs weU äs with metabolism of other trace metals. Another mechanism for Fe toxicity, involving interference with sulfur metaboÜsm, appears possible, if high, tissue organic-S is required in some http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Botanica Marina de Gruyter

Culture Studies of Halodule wrightii Aschers. Edaphic Requirements

Botanica Marina, Volume 25 (10) – Jan 1, 1982

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0006-8055
eISSN
1437-4323
DOI
10.1515/botm.1982.25.10.477
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction Measurements of field conditions (Pulich 1982) revealed that sediment steady state pools of free H 2 S, acid-volatile sulfide (FeS), and water-soluble Fe and Mn correlated with growth of shoalgrass (Halodule wrightü Aschers.) into unvegetated Sediments. A positive correlation with shoalgrass production was found for sulfide (H2S or organic-SH) and Mn2+, while Fe appeared äs a negative edaphic factor when interstitial water concentrations exceeded l g Fe per ml. A buildup of low levels of sediment sulfide during Halodule colonization was postulated äs necessary to condition the Sediments and control soluble Fe (and other heavy metals) levels by complexing with Fe2+, thereby converting it to insoluble FeS. Excess sediment, soluble Fe2* may be potentially toxic to Halodule by similar mechanisms described for rice (Ponnamperuma 1955, Tanaka et al. 1968, Howeler 1973), sugar cane (Clements et al 1974), and various legumes (Ambler and Brown 1969, Brown and Jones 1977, Foy et al 1978). These studies have documented that excess Fe interferes with Mn, P, and K uptake and translocation, äs weU äs with metabolism of other trace metals. Another mechanism for Fe toxicity, involving interference with sulfur metaboÜsm, appears possible, if high, tissue organic-S is required in some

Journal

Botanica Marinade Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1982

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