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Cooling and Warming of Climate of the Earth’s Northern Hemisphere (On the Basis of Fluctuations of the Oxygen Isotope Δ18O and Dendrological Data)

Cooling and Warming of Climate of the Earth’s Northern Hemisphere (On the Basis of Fluctuations... AbstractContent fluctuations of the oxygen isotope δ18O in the Devon Island ice core during the last 100 000 years are a measure of climate fluctuations in the Northern Hemisphere. The course of content of the oxygen isotope δ18O and the sums of solar radiation reaching the upper edge of the atmosphere are characterized by approximate minima and maxima (by positive correlation). This proves that, during the last hundred thousand years, climate fluctuations (cooling and warming) in the Northern Hemisphere were conditioned by long-term changes of the orbit and altitude of the Earth’s axis. Climate fluctuation forecasts for the Northern Hemisphere were developed for the next 40 000 years on the basis of the established periods of change of the oxygen isotope δ18O and the known solar radiation periodicity. Climate changes in Europe during the last 25000 years were presented together with a forecast for 1000 years (according to organic substances in deposits and radiation) as well as climate changes in Europe in the period from -500 years BP to 2100 AD (according to δ18O and pine tree-rings). It showed that climate changes depended on the concentration of planet mass in relation to the ecliptic plane (from the gravitational impact of planets on the Sun). Concentration courses of planet mass in the Solar System and climate fluctuations in the Northern Hemisphere were compared. Of interest are examples of synchronic fluctuations, i.e. dispersal of planet mass in the Solar System, the widths of pine and spruce tree rings and air temperatures in Europe. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Miscellanea Geographica de Gruyter

Cooling and Warming of Climate of the Earth’s Northern Hemisphere (On the Basis of Fluctuations of the Oxygen Isotope Δ18O and Dendrological Data)

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2010 Jerzy Boryczka et al, published by Sciendo
ISSN
2084-6118
eISSN
2084-6118
DOI
10.2478/mgrsd-2010-0005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractContent fluctuations of the oxygen isotope δ18O in the Devon Island ice core during the last 100 000 years are a measure of climate fluctuations in the Northern Hemisphere. The course of content of the oxygen isotope δ18O and the sums of solar radiation reaching the upper edge of the atmosphere are characterized by approximate minima and maxima (by positive correlation). This proves that, during the last hundred thousand years, climate fluctuations (cooling and warming) in the Northern Hemisphere were conditioned by long-term changes of the orbit and altitude of the Earth’s axis. Climate fluctuation forecasts for the Northern Hemisphere were developed for the next 40 000 years on the basis of the established periods of change of the oxygen isotope δ18O and the known solar radiation periodicity. Climate changes in Europe during the last 25000 years were presented together with a forecast for 1000 years (according to organic substances in deposits and radiation) as well as climate changes in Europe in the period from -500 years BP to 2100 AD (according to δ18O and pine tree-rings). It showed that climate changes depended on the concentration of planet mass in relation to the ecliptic plane (from the gravitational impact of planets on the Sun). Concentration courses of planet mass in the Solar System and climate fluctuations in the Northern Hemisphere were compared. Of interest are examples of synchronic fluctuations, i.e. dispersal of planet mass in the Solar System, the widths of pine and spruce tree rings and air temperatures in Europe.

Journal

Miscellanea Geographicade Gruyter

Published: Dec 1, 2010

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