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Contacts of Russian in the post-Soviet space

Contacts of Russian in the post-Soviet space The article discusses the importance of contact linguistic research for a gen- eral understanding of the language dynamics and linguistic processes in the post-Soviet space. Unlike political and macrosociolinguistic studies, contact linguistic case studies on language contacts in FSU are still scarce; some rea- sons being the heterogeneity of data and isolation of Eastern scholars. The review is concerned with contacts of Russian language with Ukrainian, Kazakh and Estonian. It is demonstrated that the particular cases are relevant for a general discussion on the directionality of contact-induced change, grammar of code-switching, and the emergence of contact varieties. Keywords: language contacts; post-Soviet studies; Russian; Ukrainian; Kazakh; Estonian. 1. Introduction The collapse of the USSR and the subsequent fundamental changes that affected politics, language policies, sociocultural settings, minority-majority relations, language choice patterns, and the character and distribution of bi- and multi- lingualism, immediately attracted attention of scholars in social and political sciences but, surprisingly, not so much in contact linguists. Political scientists, most notably Laitin (1998) and Kolstø (1995, 1999) from the West and Lebedeva (1995) and Savoskul (2001) from the East with their teams conducted neces- sary foundational research. Later, linguistic anthropologists and sociolinguists started their research in the post-Soviet http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Linguistics Review de Gruyter

Contacts of Russian in the post-Soviet space

Applied Linguistics Review , Volume 1 (2010): 44 – Jun 14, 2010

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © by Walter de Gruyter GmbH
ISSN
1868-6303
eISSN
1868-6311
DOI
10.1515/9783110222654.85
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The article discusses the importance of contact linguistic research for a gen- eral understanding of the language dynamics and linguistic processes in the post-Soviet space. Unlike political and macrosociolinguistic studies, contact linguistic case studies on language contacts in FSU are still scarce; some rea- sons being the heterogeneity of data and isolation of Eastern scholars. The review is concerned with contacts of Russian language with Ukrainian, Kazakh and Estonian. It is demonstrated that the particular cases are relevant for a general discussion on the directionality of contact-induced change, grammar of code-switching, and the emergence of contact varieties. Keywords: language contacts; post-Soviet studies; Russian; Ukrainian; Kazakh; Estonian. 1. Introduction The collapse of the USSR and the subsequent fundamental changes that affected politics, language policies, sociocultural settings, minority-majority relations, language choice patterns, and the character and distribution of bi- and multi- lingualism, immediately attracted attention of scholars in social and political sciences but, surprisingly, not so much in contact linguists. Political scientists, most notably Laitin (1998) and Kolstø (1995, 1999) from the West and Lebedeva (1995) and Savoskul (2001) from the East with their teams conducted neces- sary foundational research. Later, linguistic anthropologists and sociolinguists started their research in the post-Soviet

Journal

Applied Linguistics Reviewde Gruyter

Published: Jun 14, 2010

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