Comparison of Solvents for Extracting Chlorophylls from Marine Macrophytes

Comparison of Solvents for Extracting Chlorophylls from Marine Macrophytes Introduction Traditionally acetone, usually 90%, has been the Standard solvent for the extraction of photosynthetic pigments from algal and other plant tissue, äs well äs for the measurement of Chlorophyll in water columns and sediment. The use of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), äs the initial extractant of photosynthetic pigments from seaweeds, was first described by Seely et al (1972). DMSO was first prepared in the late ISOO's by the oxidation of dimethyl sulphide, but it wasn't until the late 1950's that DMSO was discovered to be an excellent solvent for many compounds which are insoluble in other liquids. Since that time many applications of DMSO have been described in chemistry, biology, medicine, pharmacology, etc. These and other aspects of this remarkable compound are covered in the excellent book "Dimethyl Sulphoxide" (Jacob et al. 1971). Although DMSO was known äs a solvent for proteins, starch and other plant compounds, it was not used for pigment extraction until the work of Seely et al. (1972). They had first used it to obtain Chlorophyll c from kelp in good quality and condition, free from Chlorophyll a (Seely, pers. comm.). Then he and others developed the method to extract and quantify photosynthetic pigments http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Botanica Marina de Gruyter

Comparison of Solvents for Extracting Chlorophylls from Marine Macrophytes

Botanica Marina, Volume 25 (9) – Jan 1, 1982

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0006-8055
eISSN
1437-4323
DOI
10.1515/botm.1982.25.9.445
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction Traditionally acetone, usually 90%, has been the Standard solvent for the extraction of photosynthetic pigments from algal and other plant tissue, äs well äs for the measurement of Chlorophyll in water columns and sediment. The use of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), äs the initial extractant of photosynthetic pigments from seaweeds, was first described by Seely et al (1972). DMSO was first prepared in the late ISOO's by the oxidation of dimethyl sulphide, but it wasn't until the late 1950's that DMSO was discovered to be an excellent solvent for many compounds which are insoluble in other liquids. Since that time many applications of DMSO have been described in chemistry, biology, medicine, pharmacology, etc. These and other aspects of this remarkable compound are covered in the excellent book "Dimethyl Sulphoxide" (Jacob et al. 1971). Although DMSO was known äs a solvent for proteins, starch and other plant compounds, it was not used for pigment extraction until the work of Seely et al. (1972). They had first used it to obtain Chlorophyll c from kelp in good quality and condition, free from Chlorophyll a (Seely, pers. comm.). Then he and others developed the method to extract and quantify photosynthetic pigments

Journal

Botanica Marinade Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1982

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