Cognitive vs. generative construction grammar: The case of coercion and argument structure

Cognitive vs. generative construction grammar: The case of coercion and argument structure Abstract One of the most salient hallmarks of construction grammar is its approach to argument structure and coercion: rather than positing many different verb senses in the lexicon, the same lexical construction may freely interact with multiple argument structure constructions. This view has however been criticized from within the construction grammar movement for leading to overgeneration. This paper argues that this criticism falls flat for two reasons: (1) lexicalism, which is the alternative solution proposed by the critics, has already been proven to overgenerate itself, and (2) the argument of overgeneration becomes void if grammar is implemented as a problem-solving model rather than as a generative competence model; a claim that the paper substantiates through a computational operationalization of argument structure and coercion in Fluid Construction Grammar. The paper thus shows that the current debate on argument structure is hiding a much more fundamental rift between practitioners of construction grammar that touches upon the role of grammar itself. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cognitive Linguistics de Gruyter

Cognitive vs. generative construction grammar: The case of coercion and argument structure

Cognitive Linguistics, Volume 26 (4) – Nov 1, 2015

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by the
ISSN
0936-5907
eISSN
1613-3641
DOI
10.1515/cog-2014-0074
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract One of the most salient hallmarks of construction grammar is its approach to argument structure and coercion: rather than positing many different verb senses in the lexicon, the same lexical construction may freely interact with multiple argument structure constructions. This view has however been criticized from within the construction grammar movement for leading to overgeneration. This paper argues that this criticism falls flat for two reasons: (1) lexicalism, which is the alternative solution proposed by the critics, has already been proven to overgenerate itself, and (2) the argument of overgeneration becomes void if grammar is implemented as a problem-solving model rather than as a generative competence model; a claim that the paper substantiates through a computational operationalization of argument structure and coercion in Fluid Construction Grammar. The paper thus shows that the current debate on argument structure is hiding a much more fundamental rift between practitioners of construction grammar that touches upon the role of grammar itself.

Journal

Cognitive Linguisticsde Gruyter

Published: Nov 1, 2015

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