BREEDING HABITS IN THE INDIAN VESPERTILIONID BAT, PIPISTRELLUS CEYLONICUS CHRYSOTHRIX (WROUGHTON)

BREEDING HABITS IN THE INDIAN VESPERTILIONID BAT, PIPISTRELLUS CEYLONICUS CHRYSOTHRIX (WROUGHTON) INTRODUCTION The reproductive activities of the bats living in cold and temperate climates have been studied extensively during the past nearly a century. However, the study of the breeding habits of the tropical bats has received the attention of biologists comparatively recently after the pioneer work of Baker and his associates (1936 , 1936fr), who showed that there are basic differences in the reproductive behaviour between the bats inhabiting cold climates and those living in warm regions. Although India has a rich chiropteran fauna details of reproduction are known with respect to very few bats, and even amons these the pattern of reproduction varies considerably. It was, therefore, felt that a detailed investigation of the breeding habits of Pipistrellus ceylonicus chrysothrix would be of considerable interest and value. * Department of Zoology, Institute of Science, Nagpur, India. HISTORICAL REVIEW Various workers have given reviews of the earlier literature pertaining to the reproduction and breeding habits of the insectivorus bats (Duval, 1895 ; Hartman, 1933 ; Baker and Bird, 1936 ; Wimsatt, 1942; Gopalakrishna, 1947, 1948, 1955 ; Ramaswamy, 1961). Gopalakrishna (1955) has classified the reproductive patterns of bats into several types and in the following review the same http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mammalia - International Journal of the Systematics, Biology and Ecology of Mammals de Gruyter

BREEDING HABITS IN THE INDIAN VESPERTILIONID BAT, PIPISTRELLUS CEYLONICUS CHRYSOTHRIX (WROUGHTON)

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0025-1461
eISSN
1864-1547
DOI
10.1515/mamm.1971.35.2.283
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTION The reproductive activities of the bats living in cold and temperate climates have been studied extensively during the past nearly a century. However, the study of the breeding habits of the tropical bats has received the attention of biologists comparatively recently after the pioneer work of Baker and his associates (1936 , 1936fr), who showed that there are basic differences in the reproductive behaviour between the bats inhabiting cold climates and those living in warm regions. Although India has a rich chiropteran fauna details of reproduction are known with respect to very few bats, and even amons these the pattern of reproduction varies considerably. It was, therefore, felt that a detailed investigation of the breeding habits of Pipistrellus ceylonicus chrysothrix would be of considerable interest and value. * Department of Zoology, Institute of Science, Nagpur, India. HISTORICAL REVIEW Various workers have given reviews of the earlier literature pertaining to the reproduction and breeding habits of the insectivorus bats (Duval, 1895 ; Hartman, 1933 ; Baker and Bird, 1936 ; Wimsatt, 1942; Gopalakrishna, 1947, 1948, 1955 ; Ramaswamy, 1961). Gopalakrishna (1955) has classified the reproductive patterns of bats into several types and in the following review the same

Journal

Mammalia - International Journal of the Systematics, Biology and Ecology of Mammalsde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1971

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