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Borderland Projects of Sasanian Empire: Intersection of Domestic and Foreign Policies

Borderland Projects of Sasanian Empire: Intersection of Domestic and Foreign Policies The landscapes of the Sasanian Empire have been studied in detail and have been remarkably well interpreted during past few decades. Recent research in borderland areas has also increased our knowledge of Sasanian policies in borderlands. The Sasanian Empire is well known for massive construction work. Projects such as construction of fortifications and defensive walls, irrigation systems, fortified towns and cities in the Sasanian period usually are attributed to the reigns of Kawad I and his son Husraw I Anushirwan in the sixth century. This attribution mostly derives from historical documents in which Husraw is seen as primarily responsible for these massive projects. Recent archaeological researches in the Gorgn plain in the northeast of Iran and in Mughan Steppe in Iranian Azerbaijan have demonstrated the possibility of dating these projects earlier in the fifth century. This is significant because it may shed more light on the socio-political dynamics of the Sasanian Empire. Focusing on the Caucasus, especially on data acquired from the Mughan Steppe projects, I will try to place this new data and information in its socio-political context and reconsider earlier notions on borderlands of the Sasanian Empire. Regardless of insecurity in borderlands, the Sasanian Empire heavily http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Ancient History de Gruyter

Borderland Projects of Sasanian Empire: Intersection of Domestic and Foreign Policies

Journal of Ancient History , Volume 2 (2) – Nov 1, 2014

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by the
ISSN
2324-8106
eISSN
2324-8114
DOI
10.1515/jah-2014-0015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The landscapes of the Sasanian Empire have been studied in detail and have been remarkably well interpreted during past few decades. Recent research in borderland areas has also increased our knowledge of Sasanian policies in borderlands. The Sasanian Empire is well known for massive construction work. Projects such as construction of fortifications and defensive walls, irrigation systems, fortified towns and cities in the Sasanian period usually are attributed to the reigns of Kawad I and his son Husraw I Anushirwan in the sixth century. This attribution mostly derives from historical documents in which Husraw is seen as primarily responsible for these massive projects. Recent archaeological researches in the Gorgn plain in the northeast of Iran and in Mughan Steppe in Iranian Azerbaijan have demonstrated the possibility of dating these projects earlier in the fifth century. This is significant because it may shed more light on the socio-political dynamics of the Sasanian Empire. Focusing on the Caucasus, especially on data acquired from the Mughan Steppe projects, I will try to place this new data and information in its socio-political context and reconsider earlier notions on borderlands of the Sasanian Empire. Regardless of insecurity in borderlands, the Sasanian Empire heavily

Journal

Journal of Ancient Historyde Gruyter

Published: Nov 1, 2014

References