Book notices

Book notices Inge Hofmann: Nubisches Wörterverzeichnis :Nubisch-deutsches unddeutsch-nubisches Wörterverzeichnis nach dem Kenzi-Material des Samuel Ali Hisen (1863-1927). (Collectanea Institut! Anthropos, 35.) Berlin: Dietrich Reimer, 1986. The study of the Nubian languages spoken in the Nile Valley has a long tradition that goes back to the middle of the last Century. The early researchers on Nubian shared the opinion that Nile Nubian was one language split into three or four dialects: Kenzi, Dongolawi, Mahas, and Fadicca or Mahas-Fadicca. In the course of the Century it became more and more obvious that Kenzi and Dongolawi are not mutually intelligible with Mahas-Fadicca, the latter being now called Nobiin in accordance with the self-designation of its Speakers. Linguists today acknowledge the existence of two Nubian languages spoken in the Nile Valley, one consisting of the closely related dialects Kenzi-Dongolawi, the other of Nobiin. The Kenzi people used to live in Upper Egypt north of Korosko. After the erection of the Assuan High Dam in the mid sixties they had to leave their homeland on the banks of the Nile and were resettled in the area of Köm Ombo. This resettlement, to a large extent, destroyed the traditional Nubian way of life. As a consequence, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of African Languages and Linguistics de Gruyter

Loading next page...
 
/lp/de-gruyter/book-notices-d6YFxJNg8s
Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0167-6164
eISSN
1613-3811
DOI
10.1515/jall.1993.14.1.85
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Inge Hofmann: Nubisches Wörterverzeichnis :Nubisch-deutsches unddeutsch-nubisches Wörterverzeichnis nach dem Kenzi-Material des Samuel Ali Hisen (1863-1927). (Collectanea Institut! Anthropos, 35.) Berlin: Dietrich Reimer, 1986. The study of the Nubian languages spoken in the Nile Valley has a long tradition that goes back to the middle of the last Century. The early researchers on Nubian shared the opinion that Nile Nubian was one language split into three or four dialects: Kenzi, Dongolawi, Mahas, and Fadicca or Mahas-Fadicca. In the course of the Century it became more and more obvious that Kenzi and Dongolawi are not mutually intelligible with Mahas-Fadicca, the latter being now called Nobiin in accordance with the self-designation of its Speakers. Linguists today acknowledge the existence of two Nubian languages spoken in the Nile Valley, one consisting of the closely related dialects Kenzi-Dongolawi, the other of Nobiin. The Kenzi people used to live in Upper Egypt north of Korosko. After the erection of the Assuan High Dam in the mid sixties they had to leave their homeland on the banks of the Nile and were resettled in the area of Köm Ombo. This resettlement, to a large extent, destroyed the traditional Nubian way of life. As a consequence,

Journal

Journal of African Languages and Linguisticsde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1993

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off