BODY TEMPERATURE IN THE AFRICAN ELEPHANT AS RELATED TO AMBIENT TEMPERATURE

BODY TEMPERATURE IN THE AFRICAN ELEPHANT AS RELATED TO AMBIENT TEMPERATURE by William H. ELDER and Don H. RODGERS Les temperatures corporelies d'elophants africains males, immediatement apres leur immobilisation par de I'otorphine, variaient entre 32,5 et 37,5 °C et montraient une relation linoaire avec les temperatures ambiantes un niveau considerable : p < .001. Cette grande variation est similaire celle que trouve chez les chameaux et remplit probablement la m6me fonction dans la conservation de l'eau et de Fe"nergie n4cessaires pour la regulation des temporatures. Because elephants are the largest living land mammals and, like man, are nearly hairless, they face unique problems in heat loss and control. For these reasons the body temperature of elephants has been the subject of considerable investigation. Early studies of body temperature in the Asian elephant (Elephas indicus) were accomplished by inserting a thermometer at arm's length into the rectum for at least 1 minute (Benedict and Lee, 1936). These temperatures ranged from 97.4 to 98.8 °F [36.3 to 37.1 °C]. Fecal temperatures of 24 Asian circus elephants ranged from 35.9 to 37.2 °C (average 36.6 <>C or 97.7 °F) (Benedict, 1936). Urine temperatures of 30 circus animals averaged 35.9 °C or 0.7 °C less than fecal temperatures. This difference was attributed to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mammalia - International Journal of the Systematics, Biology and Ecology of Mammals de Gruyter

BODY TEMPERATURE IN THE AFRICAN ELEPHANT AS RELATED TO AMBIENT TEMPERATURE

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0025-1461
eISSN
1864-1547
DOI
10.1515/mamm.1975.39.3.395
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

by William H. ELDER and Don H. RODGERS Les temperatures corporelies d'elophants africains males, immediatement apres leur immobilisation par de I'otorphine, variaient entre 32,5 et 37,5 °C et montraient une relation linoaire avec les temperatures ambiantes un niveau considerable : p < .001. Cette grande variation est similaire celle que trouve chez les chameaux et remplit probablement la m6me fonction dans la conservation de l'eau et de Fe"nergie n4cessaires pour la regulation des temporatures. Because elephants are the largest living land mammals and, like man, are nearly hairless, they face unique problems in heat loss and control. For these reasons the body temperature of elephants has been the subject of considerable investigation. Early studies of body temperature in the Asian elephant (Elephas indicus) were accomplished by inserting a thermometer at arm's length into the rectum for at least 1 minute (Benedict and Lee, 1936). These temperatures ranged from 97.4 to 98.8 °F [36.3 to 37.1 °C]. Fecal temperatures of 24 Asian circus elephants ranged from 35.9 to 37.2 °C (average 36.6 <>C or 97.7 °F) (Benedict, 1936). Urine temperatures of 30 circus animals averaged 35.9 °C or 0.7 °C less than fecal temperatures. This difference was attributed to

Journal

Mammalia - International Journal of the Systematics, Biology and Ecology of Mammalsde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1975

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