Blood Plasma Pseudouridine in Patients with Malignant Proliferative Diseases

Blood Plasma Pseudouridine in Patients with Malignant Proliferative Diseases Introduction Motyl et al.: Plasma pseudouridine in malignant proliferative diseases Malignant growth is accompanied by a rapid turnover of nucleic acids. Nucleic acid turnover may be evaluated by measuring its synthesis as well as degradation rate. RNA molecules contain both nucleosides and modified nucleosides formed post-transcriptionally by the action of modifying enzymes. In contrast to nucleosides, most of the modified RNA catabolites are not reutilized in nucleotide synthesis by salvage pathways, nor are they further degraded. Modified nucleosides released from RNA molecules in the cell appear in extracellular fluid, as well as blood plasma, and they are excreted in urine, some of them quantitatively (1, 2). The measurement of urinary excretion of pseudouridine, 7-methylguanine, and N2,N2-dimethyl-guanosine was used to assess whole-body turnover of rRNA, mRNA, and tRNA in preterm infants and adults (3, 4). Pseudouridine is generally excreted in concentrations of 10 to 100 times that of other nucleosides, both in healthy subjects and cancer patients (5, 6). The source of pseudouridine detected in urine is whole-body catabolism of tRNA and rRNA (3, 4). Among several modified nucleosides tested, pseudouridine is the compound of choice for investigation in the follow up of neoplastic disease (5). There is a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine de Gruyter

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
1434-6621
eISSN
1437-4331
DOI
10.1515/cclm.1993.31.11.765
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction Motyl et al.: Plasma pseudouridine in malignant proliferative diseases Malignant growth is accompanied by a rapid turnover of nucleic acids. Nucleic acid turnover may be evaluated by measuring its synthesis as well as degradation rate. RNA molecules contain both nucleosides and modified nucleosides formed post-transcriptionally by the action of modifying enzymes. In contrast to nucleosides, most of the modified RNA catabolites are not reutilized in nucleotide synthesis by salvage pathways, nor are they further degraded. Modified nucleosides released from RNA molecules in the cell appear in extracellular fluid, as well as blood plasma, and they are excreted in urine, some of them quantitatively (1, 2). The measurement of urinary excretion of pseudouridine, 7-methylguanine, and N2,N2-dimethyl-guanosine was used to assess whole-body turnover of rRNA, mRNA, and tRNA in preterm infants and adults (3, 4). Pseudouridine is generally excreted in concentrations of 10 to 100 times that of other nucleosides, both in healthy subjects and cancer patients (5, 6). The source of pseudouridine detected in urine is whole-body catabolism of tRNA and rRNA (3, 4). Among several modified nucleosides tested, pseudouridine is the compound of choice for investigation in the follow up of neoplastic disease (5). There is a

Journal

Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicinede Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1993

References

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