Biomechanical Pulping of Loblolly Pine Chips with Selected White-Rot Fungi

Biomechanical Pulping of Loblolly Pine Chips with Selected White-Rot Fungi Introduction Mechanical pulping operations consume large quantities of electrical energy to produce high yield but relatively weak pulps with useful optical properties (Kano et al. 1982; Kurdin 1979; Leask and Kocurek 1987; Pulp and Paper 1989;West 1979). Such pulps are desirable for printing papers because of their optical properties. Groundwood process produces the weakest mechanical pulp with the best optical properties, and is the least energy intensive. Refiner mechanical pulping processes produce stronger pulps with reduced optical properties, but require more energy. Adding steam pressure to the refining operation (thermomechanical pulp) (TMP), and chemicals together with steam pressurization (chemithermomechanical pulp) (CTMP), retains more of the basic fiber length and improves paper strength (Beath and Mihelich 1977; Higgins et al. 1978; Kurdin 1979; Mokvist et al. 1985; Wegner 1982,1987). However, the increased strength properties are offset by reduced optical properties, and the TMP and CTMP processes may actually increase energy consumption (Kurdin 1979; Beath and Mihelich 1977). The CTMP process also generates a troublesome dilute waste liquor stream. Mechanical pulp production is increasing (Atack 1985; Jackson 1985), although growth has reThis article was written and prepared by Government employees on official time, and it is therefore in the public http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Holzforschung - International Journal of the Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Technology of Wood de Gruyter

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0018-3830
eISSN
1437-434X
DOI
10.1515/hfsg.1993.47.1.36
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction Mechanical pulping operations consume large quantities of electrical energy to produce high yield but relatively weak pulps with useful optical properties (Kano et al. 1982; Kurdin 1979; Leask and Kocurek 1987; Pulp and Paper 1989;West 1979). Such pulps are desirable for printing papers because of their optical properties. Groundwood process produces the weakest mechanical pulp with the best optical properties, and is the least energy intensive. Refiner mechanical pulping processes produce stronger pulps with reduced optical properties, but require more energy. Adding steam pressure to the refining operation (thermomechanical pulp) (TMP), and chemicals together with steam pressurization (chemithermomechanical pulp) (CTMP), retains more of the basic fiber length and improves paper strength (Beath and Mihelich 1977; Higgins et al. 1978; Kurdin 1979; Mokvist et al. 1985; Wegner 1982,1987). However, the increased strength properties are offset by reduced optical properties, and the TMP and CTMP processes may actually increase energy consumption (Kurdin 1979; Beath and Mihelich 1977). The CTMP process also generates a troublesome dilute waste liquor stream. Mechanical pulp production is increasing (Atack 1985; Jackson 1985), although growth has reThis article was written and prepared by Government employees on official time, and it is therefore in the public

Journal

Holzforschung - International Journal of the Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Technology of Woodde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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