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Being at Home in the Early Chalcolithic. The Longhouse Phenomenon in the Brześć Kujawski Culture in the Polish Lowlands

Being at Home in the Early Chalcolithic. The Longhouse Phenomenon in the Brześć Kujawski Culture... Abstract The Brześć Kujawski culture emerged in the Polish Lowlands in the second half of the 5th millennium BC. It shares many characteristic features with Chalcolithic cultures of the Carpathian Basin indicating that BKK communities belonged to the wider ‘late Lengyel interaction sphere’. However, there are very striking regional distinctions in the material culture of these communities, which appear to reflect a conscious attempt to emphasize local identity, incorporating both innovation and conservatism. This article focuses on one of the most distinctive features of this culture – trapezoidal longhouses, presented here in the context of astonishingly various and hierarchical settlement system of the BKK. In this respect the iconic character of houses expressed by the uniformity of their form and size, seems to be a deliberate decision that stressed local identity in reference to the LBK heritage as well as other contemporary communities inhabiting the Polish Lowlands in the 5th millennium BC. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Open Archaeology de Gruyter

Being at Home in the Early Chalcolithic. The Longhouse Phenomenon in the Brześć Kujawski Culture in the Polish Lowlands

Open Archaeology , Volume (1) – Sep 12, 2016

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by the
ISSN
2300-6560
eISSN
2300-6560
DOI
10.1515/opar-2016-0007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The Brześć Kujawski culture emerged in the Polish Lowlands in the second half of the 5th millennium BC. It shares many characteristic features with Chalcolithic cultures of the Carpathian Basin indicating that BKK communities belonged to the wider ‘late Lengyel interaction sphere’. However, there are very striking regional distinctions in the material culture of these communities, which appear to reflect a conscious attempt to emphasize local identity, incorporating both innovation and conservatism. This article focuses on one of the most distinctive features of this culture – trapezoidal longhouses, presented here in the context of astonishingly various and hierarchical settlement system of the BKK. In this respect the iconic character of houses expressed by the uniformity of their form and size, seems to be a deliberate decision that stressed local identity in reference to the LBK heritage as well as other contemporary communities inhabiting the Polish Lowlands in the 5th millennium BC.

Journal

Open Archaeologyde Gruyter

Published: Sep 12, 2016

References