Basic Aspects of Action Tremors in the Human M. Brachioradialis - Grundlegende Aspekte von Muskelschwingungen im M. Brachioradialis des Menschen

Basic Aspects of Action Tremors in the Human M. Brachioradialis - Grundlegende Aspekte von... Introduction The phenomenon of trembling or tremor of the fingers and hands has long been known. It occurs out of nervousness, during or after a period of strain, cold, hyperthyroidy, etc. In the past, this phenomenon was observed by means of a sooted box [6,10]. In 1978 Desmedt [2] published Physiological tremor, Findley and Capildeo [4] the book Movement disOrders: tremor, in 1984. These books summarize the current state of knowledge in this field. Tfre majority of irernor measurements are done on the fingers, hands or wrists. However, the contraction of the skeletal muacles is the primary source of the tremors, Tüese action tremorg of the muscles are influen* ced by dampißg, conduction aßd re$onance> The ultimate result' of tftesefactors is tremor of the fiflgers, etc. The geneii$;pf.iremdrsis very eomplicated, the0e distur*· of the oscillations. This technique was practiced, among others, by Keidel and Keidel [7]. There are difficulties with their methods: 1. The limb was not fixed, so resonance was possible. 2. The chosen muscles are mechanically very complicated. This study sought to reduce the number of disturbing factors by the following means: 1. choosing structurally simple monopolar and monoarticular muscle 2. diminishing resonance by fixation of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biomedizinische Technik / Biomedical Engineering de Gruyter

Basic Aspects of Action Tremors in the Human M. Brachioradialis - Grundlegende Aspekte von Muskelschwingungen im M. Brachioradialis des Menschen

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0013-5585
eISSN
1862-278X
DOI
10.1515/bmte.1993.38.7-8.179
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction The phenomenon of trembling or tremor of the fingers and hands has long been known. It occurs out of nervousness, during or after a period of strain, cold, hyperthyroidy, etc. In the past, this phenomenon was observed by means of a sooted box [6,10]. In 1978 Desmedt [2] published Physiological tremor, Findley and Capildeo [4] the book Movement disOrders: tremor, in 1984. These books summarize the current state of knowledge in this field. Tfre majority of irernor measurements are done on the fingers, hands or wrists. However, the contraction of the skeletal muacles is the primary source of the tremors, Tüese action tremorg of the muscles are influen* ced by dampißg, conduction aßd re$onance> The ultimate result' of tftesefactors is tremor of the fiflgers, etc. The geneii$;pf.iremdrsis very eomplicated, the0e distur*· of the oscillations. This technique was practiced, among others, by Keidel and Keidel [7]. There are difficulties with their methods: 1. The limb was not fixed, so resonance was possible. 2. The chosen muscles are mechanically very complicated. This study sought to reduce the number of disturbing factors by the following means: 1. choosing structurally simple monopolar and monoarticular muscle 2. diminishing resonance by fixation of

Journal

Biomedizinische Technik / Biomedical Engineeringde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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