Association of sleep characteristics with adiposity markers in children

Association of sleep characteristics with adiposity markers in children AbstractBackgroundAccumulating evidence suggests a relationship between sleep alterations and overweight/obesity in children. Our aim was to investigate the association of sleep measures other than obstructive sleep apnea or sleep duration with overweight/obesity and metabolic function in children.MethodsWe conducted a prospective cohort study in school- aged children (aged 5 to 8 years, prepubertal, and 12 to 15 years, pubertal) with overweight/obesity and normal-weight children. All children underwent a standardized in-laboratory polysomnography followed by a fasting blood assessment for glucose and metabolic testing. Subjective sleep measures were investigated by a 7-day sleep diary and questionnaire. We analyzed prepubertal and pubertal groups separately using logistic regression and partial correlation analyses.ResultsA total of 151 participants were analyzed. Overweight/obese children had significantly higher odds for arousal index (prepubertal children: 1.28, Confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 1.67; pubertal children: 1.65, CI: 1.19, 2.29) than normal-weight children, independent of age and gender. In prepubertal children, arousal-index was positively associated with C-peptide (r=0.30, p=0.01), whereas Minimum O2 saturation was negatively associated with triglycerides (r=−0.34, p=0.005), adjusting for age and sex. However, associations were attenuated by further adjustment for body mass index standard deviation scores (BMI-SDS). In pubertal children, higher level of apnea-hypopnea-index and pCO2 predicted increased lipoprotein (a) levels (r=0.35, p=0.03 and r=0.40, p=0.01, respectively), independent of age, sex, and BMI-SDS. A negative association was found between pCO2 and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol (r=−0.40, p=0.01).ConclusionsOverall, we report that sleep quality as measured by arousal index may be compromised by overweight and obesity in children and warrants attention in future intervention programs. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism de Gruyter

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2020 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston
ISSN
2191-0251
eISSN
2191-0251
DOI
10.1515/jpem-2019-0517
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractBackgroundAccumulating evidence suggests a relationship between sleep alterations and overweight/obesity in children. Our aim was to investigate the association of sleep measures other than obstructive sleep apnea or sleep duration with overweight/obesity and metabolic function in children.MethodsWe conducted a prospective cohort study in school- aged children (aged 5 to 8 years, prepubertal, and 12 to 15 years, pubertal) with overweight/obesity and normal-weight children. All children underwent a standardized in-laboratory polysomnography followed by a fasting blood assessment for glucose and metabolic testing. Subjective sleep measures were investigated by a 7-day sleep diary and questionnaire. We analyzed prepubertal and pubertal groups separately using logistic regression and partial correlation analyses.ResultsA total of 151 participants were analyzed. Overweight/obese children had significantly higher odds for arousal index (prepubertal children: 1.28, Confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 1.67; pubertal children: 1.65, CI: 1.19, 2.29) than normal-weight children, independent of age and gender. In prepubertal children, arousal-index was positively associated with C-peptide (r=0.30, p=0.01), whereas Minimum O2 saturation was negatively associated with triglycerides (r=−0.34, p=0.005), adjusting for age and sex. However, associations were attenuated by further adjustment for body mass index standard deviation scores (BMI-SDS). In pubertal children, higher level of apnea-hypopnea-index and pCO2 predicted increased lipoprotein (a) levels (r=0.35, p=0.03 and r=0.40, p=0.01, respectively), independent of age, sex, and BMI-SDS. A negative association was found between pCO2 and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol (r=−0.40, p=0.01).ConclusionsOverall, we report that sleep quality as measured by arousal index may be compromised by overweight and obesity in children and warrants attention in future intervention programs.

Journal

Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolismde Gruyter

Published: Jul 28, 2020

References

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