Association of classical and related inflammatory markers with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in healthy individuals: results from the Stanislas cohort

Association of classical and related inflammatory markers with high-sensitivity C-reactive... Abstract Background: Although high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) has emerged as a cardiovascular marker, questions arise regarding the relative information provided by other inflammatory molecules. Therefore, as a first step, we examined interrelationships between serum hs-CRP concentrations and inflammatory, adhesion and growth factors in healthy adults. Methods: Circulating concentrations of hs-CRP, haptoglobin, orosomucoid, interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, IL-18, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), TNF-receptor II (TNF-RII), E-, P-, and L-selectins, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, endothelial growth factor (EGF), vascular EGF (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP-3) were measured in 154 men and 161 women of the Stanislas cohort. Leukocyte and platelet counts were also determined. Results: Correlations were significant between hs-CRP concentrations and leukocyte and platelet counts, as well as haptoglobin, orosomucoid, IL-6, and ICAM-1 concentrations (p≤0.001). Correlation coefficients for ICAM-1 were higher in men than in women (p≤0.05). When stratifying subjects according to hs-CRP levels, the group with high hs-CRP levels had significantly higher haptoglobin and orosomucoid concentrations than the others, in addition to higher leukocyte counts and IL-6 concentrations in women, and platelet counts and ICAM-1 concentrations in men. Conclusions: Further studies are warranted to explain the association pattern for hs-CRP. Partition of these factors according to their association with hs-CRP concentration opens a new perspective for choice of the best factors in terms of cardiovascular risk in relation to hs-CRP, while non-associated markers could be used to give additional information. Clin Chem Lab Med 2007;45:1339–46. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM) de Gruyter

Association of classical and related inflammatory markers with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in healthy individuals: results from the Stanislas cohort

Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM), Volume 45 (10) – Oct 1, 2007

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by the
ISSN
14346621
eISSN
14374331
DOI
10.1515/CCLM.2007.279
pmid
17727316
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Background: Although high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) has emerged as a cardiovascular marker, questions arise regarding the relative information provided by other inflammatory molecules. Therefore, as a first step, we examined interrelationships between serum hs-CRP concentrations and inflammatory, adhesion and growth factors in healthy adults. Methods: Circulating concentrations of hs-CRP, haptoglobin, orosomucoid, interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, IL-18, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), TNF-receptor II (TNF-RII), E-, P-, and L-selectins, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, endothelial growth factor (EGF), vascular EGF (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP-3) were measured in 154 men and 161 women of the Stanislas cohort. Leukocyte and platelet counts were also determined. Results: Correlations were significant between hs-CRP concentrations and leukocyte and platelet counts, as well as haptoglobin, orosomucoid, IL-6, and ICAM-1 concentrations (p≤0.001). Correlation coefficients for ICAM-1 were higher in men than in women (p≤0.05). When stratifying subjects according to hs-CRP levels, the group with high hs-CRP levels had significantly higher haptoglobin and orosomucoid concentrations than the others, in addition to higher leukocyte counts and IL-6 concentrations in women, and platelet counts and ICAM-1 concentrations in men. Conclusions: Further studies are warranted to explain the association pattern for hs-CRP. Partition of these factors according to their association with hs-CRP concentration opens a new perspective for choice of the best factors in terms of cardiovascular risk in relation to hs-CRP, while non-associated markers could be used to give additional information. Clin Chem Lab Med 2007;45:1339–46.

Journal

Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM)de Gruyter

Published: Oct 1, 2007

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