Acromegaly and Neoplasia

Acromegaly and Neoplasia Bengt-Äke Bengtsson Division of Endocrinology, Sahlgren's Hospital, S-41345 Göteborg, Sweden Acromegaly was first described by Marie in 1886 /l/, although earlier reports exist. Minkowski in 1887 /2/ suggested a pituitary source of the disorder, which was later confirmed by Cushing in 1909 /3/, who postulated excessive secretion of a growth-promoting hormone by the pituitary gland. Acromegaly is a well established syndrome :aused by excessive secretion of GH, in more :han 99% of cases due to a pituitary adenoma. The acromegalic features result from overproduction of GH, as well as a related increase of GH-dependent tissue growth factors ;uch as insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-1). Clinical manifestations of acromegaly are due ο local effects of the pituitary mass and the ystemic effects of increased growth hormone ecretion. Symptoms consist of the typical coarsening of facial features, soft-tissue swelling, lerve compression, visceral enlargement, cardiac hypertrophy and metabolic changes such as liabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia /4/. In 1980, Alexander et al /5/ published an pidemiological study of acromegaly based on a 2-year survey in the Newcastle region in Lngland. An incidence of 4.2 per million ^habitants was found, identical to the incidence 'e observed in Gothenburg, Sweden /6/. Our tudy comprised 166 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism de Gruyter

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 by the
ISSN
0334-018X
eISSN
2191-0251
DOI
10.1515/JPEM.1993.6.1.73
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Bengt-Äke Bengtsson Division of Endocrinology, Sahlgren's Hospital, S-41345 Göteborg, Sweden Acromegaly was first described by Marie in 1886 /l/, although earlier reports exist. Minkowski in 1887 /2/ suggested a pituitary source of the disorder, which was later confirmed by Cushing in 1909 /3/, who postulated excessive secretion of a growth-promoting hormone by the pituitary gland. Acromegaly is a well established syndrome :aused by excessive secretion of GH, in more :han 99% of cases due to a pituitary adenoma. The acromegalic features result from overproduction of GH, as well as a related increase of GH-dependent tissue growth factors ;uch as insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-1). Clinical manifestations of acromegaly are due ο local effects of the pituitary mass and the ystemic effects of increased growth hormone ecretion. Symptoms consist of the typical coarsening of facial features, soft-tissue swelling, lerve compression, visceral enlargement, cardiac hypertrophy and metabolic changes such as liabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia /4/. In 1980, Alexander et al /5/ published an pidemiological study of acromegaly based on a 2-year survey in the Newcastle region in Lngland. An incidence of 4.2 per million ^habitants was found, identical to the incidence 'e observed in Gothenburg, Sweden /6/. Our tudy comprised 166

Journal

Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolismde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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