Acoustic Propagation Constant at High Frequency from Modified Fluid Dynamic Equations

Acoustic Propagation Constant at High Frequency from Modified Fluid Dynamic Equations Abstract Data for the propagation constant of sound waves in rare gases are explained by using a set of integro-differential equations for the fluid dynamics variables. A simple model for the transport kernels is given. Existing measurements of the complex propagation constant as a function of frequency in gases [1--7] are excellent and extend through the transition region where the mean free path is equal to the typical length of the phenomena under study, namely the wavelength. It is well verified that the discrete modes predicted by the Navier-Stokes dispersion equation account for the data for r > 0.5 where r = vjco (in which vc is a collision frequency) while for r < 0.1 a free-molecule kinetic approach can account for the data [1--7]. Until recently, however, it has not been clear how the correct limiting forms emerge from a single expression for the pressure perturbation [8, 9]. The most frequently used approach to providing a theory for all r including the transition range has been to use a kinetic theory, that is an approach in which the one particle velocity distribution is determined. Important progress was made by Buckner and Ferziger [10]. Their work demonstrates that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics de Gruyter

Acoustic Propagation Constant at High Frequency from Modified Fluid Dynamic Equations

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0340-0204
eISSN
1437-4358
DOI
10.1515/jnet.1976.1.1.43
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Data for the propagation constant of sound waves in rare gases are explained by using a set of integro-differential equations for the fluid dynamics variables. A simple model for the transport kernels is given. Existing measurements of the complex propagation constant as a function of frequency in gases [1--7] are excellent and extend through the transition region where the mean free path is equal to the typical length of the phenomena under study, namely the wavelength. It is well verified that the discrete modes predicted by the Navier-Stokes dispersion equation account for the data for r > 0.5 where r = vjco (in which vc is a collision frequency) while for r < 0.1 a free-molecule kinetic approach can account for the data [1--7]. Until recently, however, it has not been clear how the correct limiting forms emerge from a single expression for the pressure perturbation [8, 9]. The most frequently used approach to providing a theory for all r including the transition range has been to use a kinetic theory, that is an approach in which the one particle velocity distribution is determined. Important progress was made by Buckner and Ferziger [10]. Their work demonstrates that

Journal

Journal of Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamicsde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1976

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