A Review of Some Aspects of Form and Function in Seaweeds

A Review of Some Aspects of Form and Function in Seaweeds Introduction The relationship between form and function in seaweeds is emphasized by the similarity of form in unrelated species. Morphologically similar types such äs thin blades, branched tufts, and crusts are found in several algal groups. The functional significance of a particular form is suggested when unrelated plants exhibit a similar appearance in the same habitat. For example, Norton (1970) reported algal meadows dominated by t wo strikingjy similar plants, Ciadostephus verticHiatus (a brown alga) and Halurus equisetifolius (a red alga). Similarly, the subtidal surge zone in which regulär back and forth water motion prevails (Neushul 1972) is usually dominated by laminarian algae. Representatives of other groups of seaweeds may occupy this zone, but they often bear a striking resemblance to laminarian algae -- e. g. Durvillea spp. and Marginariella (Fucales) or Desmarestia ligulata var. ftrma and Phyttogigas (Desmarestiales). In deep waters, stalked, peltate thalli, which may have extensive starch reserves, occur in several species -- e. g. Caulerpa spp. (Chlorophyta), Fauchea peltata, Maripelta rotata, Humbrella hydra, Constantinea simplex, and Sciadophycus stellata (Rhodophyta). With the flrst three species the deepwater, peltate plants contrast with non-peltate thalli of other shallow-water members of these genera. Presumably this attests to the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Botanica Marina de Gruyter

A Review of Some Aspects of Form and Function in Seaweeds

Botanica Marina, Volume 25 (11) – Jan 1, 1982

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0006-8055
eISSN
1437-4323
DOI
10.1515/botm.1982.25.11.501
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction The relationship between form and function in seaweeds is emphasized by the similarity of form in unrelated species. Morphologically similar types such äs thin blades, branched tufts, and crusts are found in several algal groups. The functional significance of a particular form is suggested when unrelated plants exhibit a similar appearance in the same habitat. For example, Norton (1970) reported algal meadows dominated by t wo strikingjy similar plants, Ciadostephus verticHiatus (a brown alga) and Halurus equisetifolius (a red alga). Similarly, the subtidal surge zone in which regulär back and forth water motion prevails (Neushul 1972) is usually dominated by laminarian algae. Representatives of other groups of seaweeds may occupy this zone, but they often bear a striking resemblance to laminarian algae -- e. g. Durvillea spp. and Marginariella (Fucales) or Desmarestia ligulata var. ftrma and Phyttogigas (Desmarestiales). In deep waters, stalked, peltate thalli, which may have extensive starch reserves, occur in several species -- e. g. Caulerpa spp. (Chlorophyta), Fauchea peltata, Maripelta rotata, Humbrella hydra, Constantinea simplex, and Sciadophycus stellata (Rhodophyta). With the flrst three species the deepwater, peltate plants contrast with non-peltate thalli of other shallow-water members of these genera. Presumably this attests to the

Journal

Botanica Marinade Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1982

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