A MANX FOLKSONG.

A MANX FOLKSONG. In the summer of 1883 I spent a few days at Port Erin in the Isle of Man along with Father Henebry, from County Waterford, Ireland, who speaks Irish äs bis native tongue. During that time we went about among the surrounding villages to see if we could discover any of the old folksongs or folktales of Man. For the most part our search was unsuccessful. The people have ceased to care for these things, and so they have fallen into oblivion. But äs a compensation for many disappointments we were lucky enough to obtain the following sweet little song from a genuine Manxman, Thomas Kermode of Bradda, near Port Erin, who, though he lost bis eyesight in bis boyhood, pursued till about three years ago the calling of fisherman. He recited the song to us, and explained it, and we took it down äs well äs we could. In September of the present year I again visited Man, and I had the song recited to me again. Unfortunately Mr. Kermode was ill during part of my visit, and I was unable to see äs much of him äs I could have wished. Above anyone whom I met http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie (ZcP) de Gruyter

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Niemeyer
ISSN
0084-5302
eISSN
1865-889X
DOI
10.1515/zcph.1897.1.1.54
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the summer of 1883 I spent a few days at Port Erin in the Isle of Man along with Father Henebry, from County Waterford, Ireland, who speaks Irish äs bis native tongue. During that time we went about among the surrounding villages to see if we could discover any of the old folksongs or folktales of Man. For the most part our search was unsuccessful. The people have ceased to care for these things, and so they have fallen into oblivion. But äs a compensation for many disappointments we were lucky enough to obtain the following sweet little song from a genuine Manxman, Thomas Kermode of Bradda, near Port Erin, who, though he lost bis eyesight in bis boyhood, pursued till about three years ago the calling of fisherman. He recited the song to us, and explained it, and we took it down äs well äs we could. In September of the present year I again visited Man, and I had the song recited to me again. Unfortunately Mr. Kermode was ill during part of my visit, and I was unable to see äs much of him äs I could have wished. Above anyone whom I met

Journal

Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie (ZcP)de Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1897

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