44. Mosbacher Kolloquium. Glyco- and Cellbiology. Biosynthesis, Transport and Function of Glycoconjugates

44. Mosbacher Kolloquium. Glyco- and Cellbiology. Biosynthesis, Transport and Function of... Biol. Chem. Hoppe-Seyler Vol. 374, pp. 217-225, April 1993 44. Mosbacher Kolloquium Glyco- and Cellbiology Biosynthesis, Transport and Function of Glycoconjugates April 22th to 24th, 1993 Abstracts MO1 MO 2 T.A. Rapoport Components and Mechanisms Involved in Protein Translocation across the ER Membrane The process of protein translocation can be divided into two phases: 1. an initiation or targeting process, which generally involves the function of the signal recognition particle (SRP) and of its receptor, and 2. the actual transfer of the polypeptide across the membrane which is only poorly understood. We have used chemical crosslinking to identify membrane proteins which are adjacent to nascent polypeptide chains as they pass through the membrane. A combination of crosslinking and reconstitution methods led to the identification of a multi-spanning membrane protein, the "translocating chain associating membrane (TRAM)" protein'''.TheTRAM protein is in vicinity of polypeptides early during their membrane transfer and it is stimulatory or required for the translocation of different secretory proteins.The main component of a putative protein-conducting channel, however, seems to be Secolp. a membrane protein originally discovered in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by genetic methods. Secolp is in proximity of translocating polypeptides throughout their membrane transfer both in yeast'2·3' and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Chemistry Hoppe-Seyler de Gruyter

44. Mosbacher Kolloquium. Glyco- and Cellbiology. Biosynthesis, Transport and Function of Glycoconjugates

Biological Chemistry Hoppe-Seyler, Volume 374 – Jan 1, 1993

Loading next page...
 
/lp/de-gruyter/44-mosbacher-kolloquium-glyco-and-cellbiology-biosynthesis-transport-Q0qtr1XMt2
Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 by the
ISSN
0177-3593
eISSN
1437-4315
DOI
10.1515/bchm3.1993.374.1-6.217
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Biol. Chem. Hoppe-Seyler Vol. 374, pp. 217-225, April 1993 44. Mosbacher Kolloquium Glyco- and Cellbiology Biosynthesis, Transport and Function of Glycoconjugates April 22th to 24th, 1993 Abstracts MO1 MO 2 T.A. Rapoport Components and Mechanisms Involved in Protein Translocation across the ER Membrane The process of protein translocation can be divided into two phases: 1. an initiation or targeting process, which generally involves the function of the signal recognition particle (SRP) and of its receptor, and 2. the actual transfer of the polypeptide across the membrane which is only poorly understood. We have used chemical crosslinking to identify membrane proteins which are adjacent to nascent polypeptide chains as they pass through the membrane. A combination of crosslinking and reconstitution methods led to the identification of a multi-spanning membrane protein, the "translocating chain associating membrane (TRAM)" protein'''.TheTRAM protein is in vicinity of polypeptides early during their membrane transfer and it is stimulatory or required for the translocation of different secretory proteins.The main component of a putative protein-conducting channel, however, seems to be Secolp. a membrane protein originally discovered in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by genetic methods. Secolp is in proximity of translocating polypeptides throughout their membrane transfer both in yeast'2·3' and

Journal

Biological Chemistry Hoppe-Seylerde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1993

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off