Sex- and maturity-based differences in movement and migration patterns of grey nurse shark, Carcharias taurus , along the eastern coast of Australia

Sex- and maturity-based differences in movement and migration patterns of grey nurse shark,... Photo-identification techniques were used to investigate temporal and spatial distributions of Carcharias taurus (Rafinesque, 1810) in relation to maturity, sex and pregnancy status at 19 sites along Australia’s eastern coastline. Of 931 individual sharks identified between 2004 and 2008, 479 were female (271 mature, 208 immature) and 452 male (288 mature, 164 immature). Mature, non-gravid females and mature males were mostly observed in the southern to central parts of this species range, along the eastern coast of Australia, in early summer to early winter. These sharks subsequently moved northward, and mating occurred in late spring to early summer in waters off the coast of northern New South Wales and southern Queensland. Pregnant C. taurus aggregated at Wolf Rock in southern Queensland, at the most northerly part of their known range, from late summer to early winter. These sharks subsequently migrated south to pup in central and southern waters of their range in late winter to late spring. Immature sharks of both sexes moved less than mature sharks, showed no synchronised migration patterns, and were mostly restricted to central and southern waters. The improved understanding of sex- and maturity-based migration of C. taurus provided here should facilitate a conservation strategy appropriate for this species in Australian waters. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Marine & Freshwater Research CSIRO Publishing

Sex- and maturity-based differences in movement and migration patterns of grey nurse shark, Carcharias taurus , along the eastern coast of Australia

Marine & Freshwater Research, Volume 62 (6) – Jun 24, 2011

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Publisher
CSIRO Publishing
Copyright
CSIRO
ISSN
1323-1650
eISSN
1323-1650
D.O.I.
10.1071/MF10152
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Photo-identification techniques were used to investigate temporal and spatial distributions of Carcharias taurus (Rafinesque, 1810) in relation to maturity, sex and pregnancy status at 19 sites along Australia’s eastern coastline. Of 931 individual sharks identified between 2004 and 2008, 479 were female (271 mature, 208 immature) and 452 male (288 mature, 164 immature). Mature, non-gravid females and mature males were mostly observed in the southern to central parts of this species range, along the eastern coast of Australia, in early summer to early winter. These sharks subsequently moved northward, and mating occurred in late spring to early summer in waters off the coast of northern New South Wales and southern Queensland. Pregnant C. taurus aggregated at Wolf Rock in southern Queensland, at the most northerly part of their known range, from late summer to early winter. These sharks subsequently migrated south to pup in central and southern waters of their range in late winter to late spring. Immature sharks of both sexes moved less than mature sharks, showed no synchronised migration patterns, and were mostly restricted to central and southern waters. The improved understanding of sex- and maturity-based migration of C. taurus provided here should facilitate a conservation strategy appropriate for this species in Australian waters.

Journal

Marine & Freshwater ResearchCSIRO Publishing

Published: Jun 24, 2011

Keywords: distribution, life-history, photo-identification, shark conservation.

References

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