Quantifying the benefits of accounting for yield potential in spatially and seasonally responsive nutrient management in a Mediterranean climate

Quantifying the benefits of accounting for yield potential in spatially and seasonally responsive... Crop yield potential is a chief determinant of nutrient requirements, but there is little objective information available on the gains in profitability that can be made by accounting for the influences of soil type and season on yield potential when making fertiliser decisions. We conducted such an assessment using crop growth simulation coupled to nutrient response curves for wheat-growing at 4 locations in the low-medium rainfall zone of Western Australia. At each location, the yield potential was simulated on 10 soil types with plant-available water capacity (PAWC) ranging from 34 to 134 mm, which represent the major soils types in Western Australia. Soil survey maps were available to quantify soil type variability and the historical climate record (1974–2005) for seasonal variability. The benefits possible for fertiliser (NPK) management that takes account of variation in crop yield potential due to season and soil type by having ‘perfect knowledge’ ranged from $2 to 40/ha. Seasonal variation was more important than soil type for the better soils (high PAWC), providing two-thirds of the benefit of perfect knowledge. On low PAWC soils, knowledge of soils and seasonal influences on yield potential were similar contributors to profit gains. An assessment of one yield forecasting system showed that about 50% of the maximum gains could be captured if seasons could be categorised as below, at, or above average at the time the fertiliser decision is made. In each catchment, 30–40% of fields showed scope for benefits in accounting for within-field variation in soil type due to large variation in PAWC, and therefore yield. Maximum profit gains and reductions in nutrient excess were greater in the low rainfall locations and also on the low PAWC soil types. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Soil Research CSIRO Publishing

Quantifying the benefits of accounting for yield potential in spatially and seasonally responsive nutrient management in a Mediterranean climate

Loading next page...
 
/lp/csiro-publishing/quantifying-the-benefits-of-accounting-for-yield-potential-in-6z1exWWqox
Publisher
CSIRO Publishing
Copyright
CSIRO
ISSN
1838-675X
eISSN
1838-6768
D.O.I.
10.1071/SR08099
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Crop yield potential is a chief determinant of nutrient requirements, but there is little objective information available on the gains in profitability that can be made by accounting for the influences of soil type and season on yield potential when making fertiliser decisions. We conducted such an assessment using crop growth simulation coupled to nutrient response curves for wheat-growing at 4 locations in the low-medium rainfall zone of Western Australia. At each location, the yield potential was simulated on 10 soil types with plant-available water capacity (PAWC) ranging from 34 to 134 mm, which represent the major soils types in Western Australia. Soil survey maps were available to quantify soil type variability and the historical climate record (1974–2005) for seasonal variability. The benefits possible for fertiliser (NPK) management that takes account of variation in crop yield potential due to season and soil type by having ‘perfect knowledge’ ranged from $2 to 40/ha. Seasonal variation was more important than soil type for the better soils (high PAWC), providing two-thirds of the benefit of perfect knowledge. On low PAWC soils, knowledge of soils and seasonal influences on yield potential were similar contributors to profit gains. An assessment of one yield forecasting system showed that about 50% of the maximum gains could be captured if seasons could be categorised as below, at, or above average at the time the fertiliser decision is made. In each catchment, 30–40% of fields showed scope for benefits in accounting for within-field variation in soil type due to large variation in PAWC, and therefore yield. Maximum profit gains and reductions in nutrient excess were greater in the low rainfall locations and also on the low PAWC soil types.

Journal

Soil ResearchCSIRO Publishing

Published: Feb 18, 2009

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off