Density and home range of feral cats in north-western Australia

Density and home range of feral cats in north-western Australia ContextFeral cats (Felis catus) pose a significant threat to biodiversity in Australia, and are implicated in current declines of small mammals in the savannas of northern Australia. Basic information on population density and ranging behaviour is essential to understand and manage threats from feral cats.AimsIn this study, we provide robust estimates of density and home range of feral cats in the central Kimberley region of north-western Australia, and we test whether population density is affected by livestock grazing, small mammal abundance and other environmental factors.MethodsDensities were measured at six transects sampled between 2011 and 2013 using arrays of infrared cameras. Cats were individually identified, and densities estimated using spatially explicit capturerecapture analysis. Home range was measured from GPS tracking of 32 cats.Key resultsDensities were similar across all transects and deployments, with a mean of 0.18 cats km2 (range=0.090.34km2). We found no evidence that population density was related to livestock grazing or abundance of small mammals. Home ranges of males were, on average, 855ha (156ha (95% CI), n=25), and those of females were half the size at 397ha (275ha (95% CI), n=7). There was little overlap in ranges of cats of the same sex.ConclusionsCompared with elsewhere in Australia outside of semiarid regions, feral cats occur at low density and have large home ranges in the central Kimberley. However, other evidence shows that despite this low density, cats are contributing to declines of small mammal populations across northern Australia.ImplicationsIt will be very difficult to reduce these already-sparse populations by direct control. Instead, land-management practices that reduce the impacts of cats on prey should be investigated. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Wildlife Research CSIRO Publishing

Density and home range of feral cats in north-western Australia

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Publisher
CSIRO Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1035-3712
eISSN
1035-3712
D.O.I.
10.1071/WR14180
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ContextFeral cats (Felis catus) pose a significant threat to biodiversity in Australia, and are implicated in current declines of small mammals in the savannas of northern Australia. Basic information on population density and ranging behaviour is essential to understand and manage threats from feral cats.AimsIn this study, we provide robust estimates of density and home range of feral cats in the central Kimberley region of north-western Australia, and we test whether population density is affected by livestock grazing, small mammal abundance and other environmental factors.MethodsDensities were measured at six transects sampled between 2011 and 2013 using arrays of infrared cameras. Cats were individually identified, and densities estimated using spatially explicit capturerecapture analysis. Home range was measured from GPS tracking of 32 cats.Key resultsDensities were similar across all transects and deployments, with a mean of 0.18 cats km2 (range=0.090.34km2). We found no evidence that population density was related to livestock grazing or abundance of small mammals. Home ranges of males were, on average, 855ha (156ha (95% CI), n=25), and those of females were half the size at 397ha (275ha (95% CI), n=7). There was little overlap in ranges of cats of the same sex.ConclusionsCompared with elsewhere in Australia outside of semiarid regions, feral cats occur at low density and have large home ranges in the central Kimberley. However, other evidence shows that despite this low density, cats are contributing to declines of small mammal populations across northern Australia.ImplicationsIt will be very difficult to reduce these already-sparse populations by direct control. Instead, land-management practices that reduce the impacts of cats on prey should be investigated.

Journal

Wildlife ResearchCSIRO Publishing

Published: Jun 10, 2015

References

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