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Bat wing airfoil and planform structures relating to aerodynamic cleanliness

Bat wing airfoil and planform structures relating to aerodynamic cleanliness In this paper we examine 12 species of Western Australian bat for anatomical and morphometric attributes related to wing lift and drag characteristics. We present values for bat wing camber (typically 6.5–9%) and its location, measurements of wing planform and tip shape (typically elliptical but with two different tip designs), dimensions of wing leading-edge flaps (typically 8–10.5% of hand wing chord but with some species having much larger flaps up to 18%) and then discuss several features related to airflow separation control. All species assessed had thin, low-camber airfoil sections, an optimisation appropriate to the range of Reynolds Numbers in which bats fly. Wing relative cleanliness was consistent with, and functionally appropriate to, species foraging strategy. The interceptors had the point of maximum camber well forward and no trailing edge wing fences, optimisations for minimum drag generation. The air-superiority bats had leading-edge fences optimised for maximum lift generation while maintaining low drag. Surface bats were characterised by their low-aspect-ratio wingtips and the absence of optimisations for either low section drag or high lift. The frugivore and the carnivore appear to be discrete optimisations while the emballinurid had a long and broad leading edge flap in combination with a high-aspect-ratio tip. We propose a range of lift and drag coefficient values for use in models of metabolic power output. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian Journal of Zoology CSIRO Publishing

Bat wing airfoil and planform structures relating to aerodynamic cleanliness

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Publisher
CSIRO Publishing
Copyright
CSIRO
ISSN
0004-959X
eISSN
1446-5698
DOI
10.1071/ZO07010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this paper we examine 12 species of Western Australian bat for anatomical and morphometric attributes related to wing lift and drag characteristics. We present values for bat wing camber (typically 6.5–9%) and its location, measurements of wing planform and tip shape (typically elliptical but with two different tip designs), dimensions of wing leading-edge flaps (typically 8–10.5% of hand wing chord but with some species having much larger flaps up to 18%) and then discuss several features related to airflow separation control. All species assessed had thin, low-camber airfoil sections, an optimisation appropriate to the range of Reynolds Numbers in which bats fly. Wing relative cleanliness was consistent with, and functionally appropriate to, species foraging strategy. The interceptors had the point of maximum camber well forward and no trailing edge wing fences, optimisations for minimum drag generation. The air-superiority bats had leading-edge fences optimised for maximum lift generation while maintaining low drag. Surface bats were characterised by their low-aspect-ratio wingtips and the absence of optimisations for either low section drag or high lift. The frugivore and the carnivore appear to be discrete optimisations while the emballinurid had a long and broad leading edge flap in combination with a high-aspect-ratio tip. We propose a range of lift and drag coefficient values for use in models of metabolic power output.

Journal

Australian Journal of ZoologyCSIRO Publishing

Published: Sep 24, 2007

References