Why the Principle of No Synonymy is Overrated

Why the Principle of No Synonymy is Overrated <jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>The formulation of Goldberg’s oft-quoted Principle of No Synonymy is one of the factors responsible for a shift away in attention from alternations as postulated in the generative transformational tradition towards a view that regards the so-called alternatives as conveying different meanings and thus not being real alternatives. The rejection of the generativist position, in which one variant was regarded as primary and the other as derived from the primary variant, is of course justified and necessary in a cognitive linguistic approach, but it will be argued in this paper that the Principle of No Synonymy – if regarded as a dogma – is misleading in that it bears the risk of missing important generalisations across different patterns of the same verb. Furthermore, it will be argued that both linguistic variation and pre-emption are not perfectly compatible with the Principle of No Synonymy.</jats:p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Zeitschrift für Anglistik und Amerikanistik CrossRef

Why the Principle of No Synonymy is Overrated

Zeitschrift für Anglistik und Amerikanistik, Volume 63 (3) – Jan 1, 2015

Why the Principle of No Synonymy is Overrated


Abstract

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>The formulation of Goldberg’s oft-quoted Principle of No Synonymy is one of the factors responsible for a shift away in attention from alternations as postulated in the generative transformational tradition towards a view that regards the so-called alternatives as conveying different meanings and thus not being real alternatives. The rejection of the generativist position, in which one variant was regarded as primary and the other as derived from the primary variant, is of course justified and necessary in a cognitive linguistic approach, but it will be argued in this paper that the Principle of No Synonymy – if regarded as a dogma – is misleading in that it bears the risk of missing important generalisations across different patterns of the same verb. Furthermore, it will be argued that both linguistic variation and pre-emption are not perfectly compatible with the Principle of No Synonymy.</jats:p>

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Publisher
CrossRef
ISSN
2196-4726
DOI
10.1515/zaa-2015-0030
Publisher site
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Abstract

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>The formulation of Goldberg’s oft-quoted Principle of No Synonymy is one of the factors responsible for a shift away in attention from alternations as postulated in the generative transformational tradition towards a view that regards the so-called alternatives as conveying different meanings and thus not being real alternatives. The rejection of the generativist position, in which one variant was regarded as primary and the other as derived from the primary variant, is of course justified and necessary in a cognitive linguistic approach, but it will be argued in this paper that the Principle of No Synonymy – if regarded as a dogma – is misleading in that it bears the risk of missing important generalisations across different patterns of the same verb. Furthermore, it will be argued that both linguistic variation and pre-emption are not perfectly compatible with the Principle of No Synonymy.</jats:p>

Journal

Zeitschrift für Anglistik und AmerikanistikCrossRef

Published: Jan 1, 2015

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